Excessively Rare Anglo-Saxon Tiermensch 'Warrior Gear' Pressblech Die 017967

Excessively Rare Anglo-Saxon Tiermensch 'Warrior Gear' Pressblech Die 017967
Excessively Rare Anglo-Saxon Tiermensch 'Warrior Gear' Pressblech Die
Copper-alloy, 6.58 grams, 26.91 mm. 5th-6th century AD. During the 6th century, the fashion evolved for decorating high-status items with pressed foil panels (known by the German term Pressblech). These foil panels were not sturdy and were backed with pitch or other materials to stabilise them. They appear on helmets (Sutton Hoo), drinking horns (Sutton Hoo, Taplow), shields (Sutton Hoo), drinking cups (Sutton Hoo) and are among the finds in the recent 'Staffordshire Hoard' assemblage, where they probably came from a helmet. The present piece is a die for the manufacture of the foils, in the form of a quadrangular panel with a billeted border enclosing a Style I Tiermensch or 'beastman' motif in standard three-band design. Pressblech designs are normally of great cultural significance, drawing on the rich symbolism of Germanic religion and military cults; the 'beastman' represents a form of animal transformation liked to the cult of the god Woden. Reference: cf. Sutton Hoo helmet discussion in Pollington, S. The English Warrior From Earliest Times till 1066, Hockwold-cum-Wilton, 2001, p. 156ff and drinking vessels in Pollington, S. The Mead Hall. Feasting in Anglo-Saxon England, Hockwold-cum-Wilton, 2003 p.130ff and fig.78. Very fine condition. Provenance: found near Eyke, Suffolk, England.
 
This item was accompanied by an illustrated Certificate of Authenticity.

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