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Roman Coins and Their Values, volume I

SEAR D R   Roman Coins and Their Values, volume I
The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 96. 532 pages, more than 1,200 illustrations in the text. Valuations in £ and $. Casebound. The original edition of Sear's Roman Coins and Their Values was published by Seaby thirty-six years ago and has been through four revisions (1970, 1974, 1981 and 1988). However, the publication of the 'Millennium Edition' of this popular work makes a radical departure from previous editions. The catalogue entries have been expanded to include a virtually complete listing of the entire Roman Republican series, as well as more comprehensive coverage of the much larger and more complex Imperial series. Greater emphasis is now placed on the precise chronology and place of mintage of each type and extensive coverage is given to the important series of billon and bronze coins struck at Alexandria over a period of more than 300 years. The valuations have been exhaustively researched from recent auction records and fixed price catalogues and many professional numismatists have contributed their valuable opinions on specific series. Prices (both in British pounds and US dollars) are now expressed in either two or three grades of preservation for each entry, usually 'VF' and 'EF' for precious metal issues, and 'F', 'VF' and 'EF' for Imperial Bronzes. Perhaps most importantly for the collector, the number of photographic illustrations in the text has been increased, and their quality improved. Expansion on this scale has inevitably led to a need to divide the work into more than one volume, but collectors and dealers will now find it of much greater value both as a source of information and as a comprehensive work of reference for this vast and complex series. Volume II will thus be entitled "The Adoptive Emperors, the Antonines and the Severans, A.D. 96-235, and Volume III "The Decline and Fall of Rome and the Triumph of Christianity, A.D. 235-491".

£50.00

Roman Coins and Their Values, volume II

SEAR D R   Roman Coins and Their Values, volume II
Covering the 'Golden Age' of Roman Imperial Coinage. 96-235 AD. Approx. 700 pages, more than 1,500 illustrations in the text. Valuations in £ and $ in at least two grades. Casebound. Covers the Imperial series from Nerva, the 'thirteenth Caesar' and first of the 'Adoptive' emperors, down to the overthrow of the severan dynasty in 235. It encompasses what may justifiably be termed the 'golden age' of the Roman Imperial Coinage. The full development of the Augustan system of coin denominations and perfection of the method by which government propaganda was communicated to the citizenry through the medium of coinage both reached their peak during these fourteen decades. The preceding coinage of the Julio-Claudian and Flavians periods has seen much experimentation with the currency system and tentative early steps in the development of the propaganda potential of the reverse types. The coinage of the Adoptive emperors and those of the Antonine and Severan dynasties saw the ultimate fulfillment of this process resulting in a coinage of unprecedented volume and complexity. As before, current market valuations are expressed in pound sterling and US dollars, in at least two grades of preservation.

£60.00

Roman Coins and Their Values, volume III

SEAR D R   Roman Coins and Their Values, volume III
Covering the Third Century Crisis and Recovery, AD 235-285. It consists of 536 pages which are fully illustrated with new photographs throughout. Valuations are in three grades of preservation. This third volume continues the comprehensive revision of coins of the Roman Empire and their values in detail. The following half century during which the Empire came perilously close to total disintegration under the pressure of foreign invasions and civil war. The economy also collapsed and with it the Imperial coinage, a desperate situation which was only partially alleviated by the currency reform of Aurelian undertaken late in his reign. The complexities of the mint attributions in this chaotic period - lacking as they do in almost every instance the name or initial of the responsible mint - have been dealt with in light of recent scholarship. Also included are detailed listings of the Antoninianus coinage not covered in the "Roman Silver Coins" series. The coinage of the Adoptive emperors and those of the Antonine and Severan dynasties saw unprecedented volume and complexity. As before, current market valuations are expressed in pound sterling and US dollars, in at least two grades of preservation.

£45.00

SEAR, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values

SEAR D R   Roman Coins and Their Values
388 pages with 12 plates. Casebound with Jacket. This 4th edition is a reprint of the Seaby's 1988 version. The only one-volume price guide to the coinage of Republican and Imperial Rome. It is an indispensable listing of all major types of gold, silver and bronze, issued over some seven hundred and fifty years by the greatest militaristic state the world has ever known.

£35.00

MELVILLE-JONES, J. A Dictionary of Ancient Roman Coins.

MELVILLE-JONES J   A Dictionary of Ancient Roman Coins
327 pages, illustrated throughout. Casebound with Jacket. Originally published in 1990. It is 115 years since Seth Stevenson's magisterial Dictionary of Roman Coins was first published, and there have been several direct reprints since which indicate its continuing value for students of the subject. In this new Dictionary of Ancient Roman Coins, Professor Jones has produced a work on a smaller scale that brings together in a more compact form the results of recent scholarship.

£30.00

Coinage in the Roman World

BURNETT A   Coinage in the Roman World
176 pages with 24 plates. Card covers. Originally published in 1986. This book takes a fresh look at the development and use of coinage in the Roman world, from the 3rd century BC to the break-up of the Empire in the 5th century AD. The emphasis is upon interpretation of the coins rather than description of types, focusing on both how and why they were circulated, and how they can illuminate the historical and economic background.

£20.00

Roman Coins inc. price guide by Adrian Marsden

MARSDEN A   Roman Coins inc. price guide
Roman coins were used in Britain for nearly 400 years and are common finds in the soil of this country. This book begins with a step-by-step guide to the identification of these fascinating objects and then discusses a range of other aspects relating to them, including a chapter on the often neglected "barbarous" imitations.Numerous tables and lists, together with approximately 400 photographs make this book not only an invaluable guide for the beginner but also gathers together in one place a stock of information for easy reference. Chapter 1 - Introduction to Roman coins and their identification. Chapter 2 - Coin legends and understanding the inscriptions on Roman coins. Chapter 3 - Portraits and propaganda. Chapter 4 - Mints: Differences between mints, mintmarks in the later empire. Chapter 5 - Roman coins in the earlier empire, up to 238. Chapter 6 - The radiate coinages, 238-296. Chapter 7 - The fourth century. Chapter 8 - The end of Roman coinage in Britain. Chapter 9 - Contemporary forgeries in Roman Britain. Chapter 10 - Treatment of coins, preservation, cataloguing etc.

£15.00

Identifying Roman Coins

REECE R & JAMES S   Identifying Roman Coins
A practical guide to the identification of site finds in Britain. London(1986). Second edition, 2000. 60 pages, line drawings. Casebound This book aims at producing an easily usable and visual recognition guide to Roman coins. Their chronological presentation follows and identifies major reverse types from the first to the late fourth centuries AD. Dr Reece’s text outlines interesting aspects of the coinage, the issues, mints, points to look for, etc., together with a select bibliography which acts as guidance for those who wish to look deeper into the subject. All the illustrations, line drawings for greater clarity and ease of recognition, have explanatory notes. Anyone who finds Roman coins, either by excavation or by chance, collects and studies them, will find this book an invaluable guide to the series.

£9.95

Roman Coinage in Britain

CASEY P J   Roman Coinage in Britain
1999. 64 pages, 15 plates, maps, charts. Card covers.This book puts the coinage of the Roman period in Britain into a perspective of the economic and political events of the time. After outlining the currency system of the Empire from the first century to the fourth and investigating the factors which influenced the volume of coinage issued by the state and the occasions on which it was issued, Mr Casey considers the way in which the coinage found on Roman sites in Britain conforms or deviates from this imperial pattern. Social, economic and locational factors are investigated, and the very characteristic pattern of the coinage found in Britain is illustrated from a number of archaeological sites. The work is aimed at the practising archaeologist as well as the general student of the past, and emphasis is placed on the need to understand the overall pattern of coin production and use in the Roman period before deductions are made about the chronology and occupation of individual sites. Almost all of the commonest Roman coins found in Britain are illustrated at actual size.

£4.99

Romano-British Coin Hoards

ABDY R   Romano-British Coin Hoards
2002. 72 pages, 58 black and white illustrations. Card covers.The best testament to Britain’s participation in Graeco-Roman civilisation is its ‘hidden’ monuments. Spectacular hoards of household valuables such as jewellery, precious-metal table utensils or decorations and also – the concern of this book – rich hoards of gold, silver and bronze coins. Many such hoards are hidden no longer, as visits to numerous museums will quickly show. Since the 1980’s there has been a rise in discoveries, mostly due to increased use of metal detectors. In response to this there has been a greater recognition of the importance of detailed recording and, in some cases, keeping coin hoards together as artefacts in their own right. This book provides an introduction to Roman coin hoards found in the Roman province of Britannia and places major discoveries, new and old, in the story of the Roman province’s monetary system. Richard Abdy curates the later Roman and early Byzantine coins at the British Museum. His duties include participating in the recording and publishing of Romano-British coin hoards as part of the treasure process.

£5.99

Studies in Ancient Coinage from Turkey

ASHTON, R   Studies in Ancient Coinage from Turkey
Royal Numismatic Society Special Publication No.29.London 1996. viii, 160; 69 plates, illustrating some 1,600 coins. Casebound.

£45.00

Roman Silver Coins, Volume I

SEABY H A   Roman Silver Coins, volume I
Republic to Augustus. 172 pages, casebound with Jacket. First Published in 1978. This is the first of several volumes dealing exclusively with Roman silver coinage, one of the most popular series among collectors of ancient coins. With 784 photographic illustrations.

£25.00

Roman Silver Coins, volume II

SEABY H A   Roman Silver Coins, volume II
Tiberius to Commodus. 264 pages, casebound with Jacket. First published in 1979. This book covers the years AD14-192 and includes some of the most emotive emperors of Roman history - Claudius, Nero, Vespasian, Trajan and Hadrian. On the reverse of the coins can be seen all facets of Roman life including politics, religion and economics.

£25.00

Roman Silver Coins, Volume III

SEABY H A   Roman Silver Coins, volume III
Pertinax to Balbinus and Pupienus. London 1982. 162 pages, 382 illustrations, valuations. Casebound. A large number of the coins uncovered by metal detector users in Great Britain are covered in this volume.

£25.00

Roman Silver Coins, Volume IV

SEABY H A   Roman Silver Coins, volume IV
Gordian III to Postumus. London 1982. 136 pages, 253 illustrations, valuations. Casebound. A large number of the coins uncovered by metal detector users in Great Britain are covered in this volume.

£30.00

Roman Silver Coins, Volume V

SEABY H A   Roman Silver Coins, volume V
Carausius to Romulus Augustus. London (1987) Reprinted 1997. 214 pages, 295 illustrations and a map, valuations. Casebound. The concluding volume in the series of books dealing exclusively with the Roman silver coinage. All major types known are listed.

£30.00

Roman Imperial Coinage, volume I

SUTHERLAND C H V & CARSON R A G   Roman Imperial Coinage, volume I
Roman Imperial Coinage (R.I.C.), volume I. From 31 BC to AD 69 - Augustus to Vitellius. (1923) Revised edition 1984, reprinted1999. xxii, 304 pages, 32 plates. Buckram, with laminated jacket.

£75.00

Roman Imperial Coinage, volume II

MATTINGLY H & SYDENHAM E A   Roman Imperial Coinage, volume II
Roman Imperial Coinage (R.I.C.), volume II. Vespasian to Hadrian. First published 1926, last reprinted 2001. xvi, 570 pages, 16plates. Buckram.

£50.00

Roman Imperial Coinage, volume III

MATTINGLY H & SYDENHAM E A   Roman Imperial Coinage, volume III
Roman Imperial Coinage (R.I.C.), volume III. Antoninus Pius to Commodus. First published 1930, last reprinted 1997. xviii,514 pages, 16 plates. Buckram.

£50.00

Roman Imperial Coinage, volume IV

MATTINGLY H, SYDENHAM EA & SUTHERLAND C H V   Roman Imperial Coinage, volume IV the set
Roman Imperial Coinage (R.I.C.), volume IV the set. Part 1 - Pertinax to Geta. 1936. xv, 399 pages, 16 plates; Part 2 - Macrinus to Pupienus. 1938. Xi, 215 pages, 13 plates; Part 3 - Gordian III to Uranius Antoninus. 1949. Xxiii, 246 pages, 16 plates. Bound as one volume. Last reprinted 1998. Buckram.

£100.00

Roman Imperial Coinage, volume V

WEBB P, Edited by MATTINGLY H & SYDENHAM E A   Roman Imperial Coinage, volume V the pair
Roman Imperial Coinage (R.I.C.), volume V. Part 1 - Valerian to Florian (the Interregnum) & Part 2 - Probus to Amandus. First published 1927 & 1933. Last reprinted 1998. Xiii, 424 pages, 12 plates. Buckram. Xix, 701 pages, 20 plates. Buckram.

£159.00

Roman Imperial Coinage, volume VI

KENT J P C. Edited by SUTHERLAND, C H V & CARSON R A G   Roman Imperial Coinage, volume VI
Roman Imperial Coinage (R.I.C.), volume VI. From Diocletian’s Reform (AD 294) to the death of Maximinus (AD 313). Firstpublished 1967, last reprinted 1997. xxiii, 727 pages, 16 plates. Buckram.

£50.00

Roman Imperial Coinage, volume VII

BRUUN PM, Edited by SUTHERLAND, C H V & CARSON R A G   Roman Imperial Coinage, volume VII
Roman Imperial Coinage (R.I.C.), volume VII. Constantine and Licinius, AD 313-337. First published 1966, last reprinted 1997.xxxi, 778 pages, 24 plates. Buckram.

£50.00

Roman Imperial Coinage, volume VIII

KENT J P C. Edited by SUTHERLAND, C H V & CARSON R A G   Roman Imperial Coinage, volume VIII
Roman Imperial Coinage (R.I.C.), volume VIII. The Family of Constantine I, AD 337-364. 1981. xlix, 605 pages, 28 plates,pull-out (busts). Buckram, with laminated jacket. Reprinted with enhanced plates 2003.

£125.00

Roman Imperial Coinage, volume IX

PEARCE J W E, Edited by MATTINGLY H, SUTHERLAND C H V & CARSON R A G   Roman Imperial Coinage, volume IX
Roman Imperial Coinage (R.I.C.), volume IX. Valentinian I to Theodosius I. First published 1951, last reprinted 1997. xliv, 334 pages, 16 plates. Buckram.

£45.00

Coin Hoards from Roman Britain Vol. X

BLAND R & ORNA-ORNSTEIN J   Coin Hoards from Roman Britain, volume X
Coin Hoards from Roman Britain, volume X.

£85.00

Coin Hoards from Roman Britain, vol. XI

ABDY R, LEINS I & WILLIAMS J   Coin Hoards from Roman Britain, volume XI
Coin Hoards from Roman Britain, vol. XI. RNS Special Publication no.36. London 2002. 234 pages, 10 plates. Cloth, dustwrapper.This, the eleventh volume of Coin Hoards from Roman Britain, is dedicated to finds of Roman hoards from the early imperial period (with terminal dates up to AD 235) discovered between 1997 and 2001. The introduction of the new Treasure Act in 1997 caused a doubling in the coin hoards reported; hence the decision to restrict the chronological range of the volume. CHRB XII (forthcoming 2003) will deal with the later Roman hoards found in the same period. The highlight of the volume is the Shapwick Villa (Somerset) hoard of over 9,000 denarii, the largest hoard of its kind from Britain to be fully published. It is complemented by an important essay on hoards of the Severan period from Britain by Richard Abdy and Roger Bland. This is the first volume of CHRB to appear as an RNS Special Publication. It serves as a second supplement to Anne Robertson's Inventory of Romano-British Coins Hoards, recently published in the same series, which contained summaries of all hoards up to and including CHRB IX. Richard Abdy, Ian Leins, and Jonathan Williams are curators of Roman coins in the Department of Coins and Medals at the British Museum.

£40.00

The Roman Imperial Coinage of Aquileia

PAOLUCCI R & ZUB A   The Roman Imperial Coinage of Aquileia
2000. 264 pages, over 800 photographic illustrations in text.Cloth. The purpose of this work is to provide a photographic catalogue of all the types and varieties known at the present day of the coinage struck at the imperial mint, Sacra Moneta, of Aquileia, established at the time of Diocletian’s reform of the monetary system, presumably in order to supply currency to the north-western regions of the Roman Empire. The Aquileia mint was opened, therefore, in 294 and closed some time before 455, during the reign of Valentinian III. The catalogue proper has been augmented by a historical and numismatic commentary which, however, to avoid the twin dangers of incompleteness and error, is merely basic. For fuller information on imperial biographies, the city of Aquileia and numismatics in general, the reader is referred to specialised academic works. Translations from Latin of all obverse and reverse legends are to be found in an appendix at the end of this book.

£70.00

Catalogue of Ancient Coins in the National Museum in Warsaw

WIERCINSKA J   Catalogue of Ancient Coins in the National Museum in Warsaw
Cons of the Roman Republic.1996. 350 pages, 77 plates. Laminated boards. Over 1,500 coins catalogued and well illustrated. A useful reference to an otherwise rather inaccessible collection, covering the period from 280 BC. to 31 BC. Whilst most of the collection corresponds to Crawford’s types, there are many interesting exceptions. All the data identifying particular coins has been included with respect to each issue: identification of mint and value, description, metal, weight in grams, diameter in millimetres and axis. Inventory numbers and references to the more important collections have also been given as well as references to Crawford’s study and earlier works.

£35.00

The Coinage of Aphrodisias

MACDONALD, D   The Coinage of Aphrodisias
London 1992. (Royal Numismatic Society Special Publication No.23).xii, 170 pages, 32 plates. Casebound. This book is a study of the coins struck by the city of Aphrodisias in Caria (in south-west Turkey). Through a detailed study of the coins of this major mint much new light is shed not only on the history of Aphrodisias itself but also on the organization of currency in the province of Asia in Roman times. Aphrodisias, one of the best-preserved ancient sites in Turkey, has become justly famous as a result of the excavations carried out over the last 30 years, which have revealed it to be one of the most important cities in the Roman province of Asia. Professor MacDonald provides a complete catalogue and die-study of the extensive coinage of this city, mostly bronze coins minted during the Roman period down to about AD 260, but also including a series of silver drachms of the first century BC. The catalogue includes 240 types comprising 300 obverse dies and 591 reverse dies, while in the introduction MacDonald discusses Kraft’s thesis on die-sharing by the cities of Asia, the die cutters of Aphrodisias, the evidence for the circulation of its coins, their denomination, the designs on their reverses and the magistrates attested on them. All the dies are illustrated on the 32 plates.

£40.00

Catalogue of Ancient Coins

WIERCINSKA J   Catalogue of Ancient Coins in the National Museum in Warsaw
Cons of the Roman Republic. 1996. 350 pages, 77 plates. Laminated boards. Over 1,500 coins catalogued and well illustrated. A useful reference to an otherwise rather inaccesible collection, covering the period from 280 BC to 31 BC Whilst most of the collection correspond to Crawford's types, there are many interesting exceptions. All the data identifying particular coins has been included with respect to each issue: identification of mint and value, description, metal, weight in grams, diameter in millimetres and axis. Inventory numbers and references to the more important collections have also been given as well as references to Crawford's study and earlier works.

£35.00

An Inventory of Romano-British Coins Hoards

ROBERTSON A S   An Inventory of Romano-British Coins Hoards
Edited by Richard Hobbs & Prof. T V Buttrey. RNS Special Publication no. 20. 2001. 580 pages,maps etc., no plates. Casebound with colour laminated jacket. Professor Anne S Robertson’s long awaited corpus brings together for the first time records of over 1,800 coin hoards from Roman Britain. The entries for each hoard include fascinating transcripts from their original sources, reflecting the author’s immense attention to detail and the sheer persistence of the research. The author searched through every conceivable potential source of information on coin hoards, from county journals to major antiquarian studies, besides examining in person coins from hoards preserved in museum collections. This volume is a vital source of reference for numismatic, economic and archaeological research into Roman Britain. There are also extensive maps tracking the changing distribution of coin hoards, exhaustive numismatic and archaeological indexes, and the author’s own drawings of surviving containers for some of the hoards. The author: Professor Robertson was Keeper of the Hunter Coin Cabinet in Glasgow where she spent most of her working life. The Editors: Richard Hobbs is the Outreach Officer with the Portable Antiquities Scheme, and author of British Iron Age coins in the British Museum. Prof. T.V. Buttrey is the retired Keeper of the Department of Coins and Medals, Fitzwilliam Musuem, and former President of the Royal Numismatic Society.

£65.00

The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49-27 BC.

SEAR D R   The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators
49-27 BC. A detailed survey including current valuations for collectors. London, 1998. xxxii, 360 pages, illustrated throughout. Casebound. The brief period covered in this book witnessed the violent transition of the Roman state from a republican constitution, presided over by the Senate, to a full military autocracy under the control of one man, the Emperor Augustus. In reality, the events of these years were merely the culmination of a movement which had been gathering strength over the preceding half-century, since the rise of men such as Marius and Sulla. Caesar had put events into motion by his invasion of Italy and his challenge to Pompey’s dominant position in Roman politics. With his assassination on the Ides of March, 44 BC, Caesar’s role was inherited by his youthful great-nephew Octavian who, against seemingly hopeless odds, succeeded in eliminating his rivals for supreme power, notably Mark Antony and his ambitious consort Cleopatra, queen of Egypt. This book traces in detail the unfolding of this drama. Each of its six chapters includes a comprehensive catalogue listing of all the relevant coin types and varieties, each with a full discussion of its significance in the interpretation of the events of the period. Information on the rarity of each type, including estimates of current value, are presented in a separate table. The numerous, though less precisely understood, local coinages of the Imperatorial period are listed in an extensive appendix. Whilst providing a comprehensive numismatic reference work for the age of transition from Republic to Empire the author has also aimed to heighten the historian’s awareness of the vital role which may be played by the numismatic evidence in the detailed chronicling of events.

£50.00

Essays in Honour of G K Jenkins and R A G Carson

PRICE M JESSOP, BURNETT A. & BLAND R   Essays in Honour of G K Jenkins and R A G Carson
Essays in Honour of G. K. Jenkins and R. A. G. Carson. London, 1993. 296 pages, 48 plates. Casebound.

£80.00

Money and Government in the Roman Empire

DUNCAN-JONES R   Money and Government in the Roman Empire
1994. Xx, 300 pages, illustrations in text. Card covers. Rome's conquests gave her access to the accumulated metal resources of most of the known world. An abundant gold and silver coinage circulated within her empire as a result. But coinage changes later suggest difficulty in maintaining metal supplies. By studying Roman coin-survivals in a wider context, Dr Duncan-Jones uncovers important facts about the origin of coin hoards of the Principate. He constructs a new profile of minting, financial policy and monetary circulation, by analysing extensive coin evidence collected for the first time. His findings considerably advance our knowledge of crucial areas of the Roman economy. This book will be an essential reference work for Roman historians and numismatists and will also be of interest to economic historians.

£20.95

Catalogue of Late Roman Coins

GRIERSON P & MAYS M   Catalogue of Late Roman Coins in the Dumbarton Oaks Collection and the Whittemore Collection
From Arcadius and Honorius to the Accesion of Anastasius. Xvi, 500 pages, including 37 plates. Casebound. This is the first fully illustrated catalogue to be published of a major collection of late Roman and early Byzantine imperial coins. It follows the general layout of the Byzantine volumes in the Dumbarton Oaks series, with a sunstantial introduction dealing with the history of the coinage, including iconography, mints, and monetary system, but differs from the others in that all the coins are illustrated in the plates, not merely a selection of the moe typical and best preserved specimens. The chief feature of the volume, apart from its illustrations, is that it brings together two coin series that in the past have tended to be studied separately.

£70.00

Greek & Roman Coins from the du Chastel Collection.

CALLATAY F DE & HEESCH J VAN   Coin Cabinet of the Royal Library of Belgium
London 1999. xix (1) 162 (2) pages, 41 plates. Casebound.

£60.00

Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Coins in the Museum at Amasya

IRELAND S   Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Coins in the Museum at Amasya
Ancient Amaseia, Turkey. RoyalNumismatic Society Special Publication No.33. viii, 124 pages, 61 plates. Cloth.

£30.00

Catalogue of Late Roman Coins in the Dumbarton Oaks Collection and the Whittemore Collection.

GRIERSON P & MAYS M   Catalogue of Late Roman Coins in the Dumbarton Oaks Collection and the Whittemore Collection
From Arcadius and Honorius to the Accession of Anastasius. xvi, 500 pages, including 37 plates. Casebound. This is the first fully illustrated catalogue to be published of a major collection of late Roman and early Byzantine imperial coins. It follows the general layout of the Byzantine volumes in the Dumbarton Oaks series, with a substantial introduction dealing with the history of the coinage, including iconography, mints, and monetary system, but differs from the others in that all the coins are illustrated in the plates, not merely a selection of the more typical and best preserved specimens. The chief feature of the volume, apart from its illustrations, is that it brings together two coin series that in the past have tended to be studied separately.

£70.00

Monnaies de l’Empire romain, vol. III

GIARD J   Monnaies de l’Empire romain, vol. III
Du soulevement de 68 apre` s J.-C. a` Nerva. 1998. x, 366 pages,132 b/w plates, 16 colour. Casebound. This third volume of the Catalogue des monnaies de l’Empire romain from the Department of Coins, Medals and Antiquities of the Bibliothe` que nationale de France, turns to the coinage issued since the revolt of C. Julius Vindex in March 68 AD, until the death of Nerva in 98 AD. It includes descriptions and illustrations of nearly 2,500 coins. The catalogue itself is preceded by a short synthesis, which takes stock of the knowledge and understanding of the period. The only extensive collection to have been exhibited before this collection in Paris is housed at the Department of Coins and Medals in the British Museum in London. It is noteworthy that the Parisian collection is virtually the same size in number as the collection in London, which means that the two complement each other perfectly. Loyal to a long tradition of erudition, with this book, the Bibliothe` que nationale is providing a work of reference for researchers, professionals and collectors alike.

£60.00

Coin Circulation in the Balkan and Danubian Provinces

DUNCAN G L   Coin Circulation in the Balkan and Danubian Provinces
AD 294-578. London 1993 (RoyalNumismatic Society Special Publication no. 26). 208 pages, 5 maps. Casebound. This book presents for the first time a complete survey of late Roman and early Byzantine coin circulation in four countries of south-east Europe: Hungary, the former Yugoslavia, Romania and Greece. The period covered, from the reform of Diocletian in AD 294 to the death of Justin II in AD 578, saw in turn a great expansion in the numbers of coins circulating during the fourth century only to be followed by a sharp decline in the fifth and a revival (in the southern part of the area) in the sixth. The author provides details of 60 hoards of gold and silver coins, 167 hoards and find-groups of bronze coins and some 250 isolated finds of precious-metal coins. Much of this material is unpublished and none of it has been brought together in this way before. Dr Duncan explores in depth such questions as why fourth-century silver coins are so abundant in Romania but not elsewhere and examines the wider historical and economic implications of the data that he has gathered. Dr Duncan studied at Oxford University and the Institute of Archaeology, London, and is now a solicitor working in London.

£35.00

Coins of Macedonia and Rome.

BURNETT A, WARTENBURG U & WITSCHONKE R   Coins of Macedonia and Rome
Essays in honour of Charles Hersh. London, 1998. xii, 230 pages, 34 plates including a frontispiece portrait. Casebound in cloth.

£60.00

WESTDAL S J   Dictionary of Roman Coin Inscriptions
Reprint 1995. 140 pages. The inscriptions which appear on Roman coins tell us a great deal about the issuer of the coin, honours or titles held by famous persons, military victories and triumphs, the approximate time of issue of given coins, as well as the identification of the issuer. This book is designed to assist in identifying the issuer of coins for the Republican and Imperial periods, and the issuing sites for Colonial or Provincial coins. The listing of inscriptions in this book, whilst a thorough representation, does not claim to be totally complete, and is presented as a guide to help attribution.

£25.00

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