Merovingian Frankish 'Cloisonné' Purse Fitting 011731

Merovingian Frankish 'Cloisonné' Purse Fitting
Copper-alloy, crystal and glass, 9.38 grams, 34.41 mm. 6th-7th century AD. A finely-made D-shaped fitting from the flap of a purse. The copper-alloy base is decorated with a geometric pattern executed in cloisonné, with intricately cut glass panels forming an interlocking curvilinear design in clear, dark blue and cupric green shades. The central element is a D-shaped cell containing a shaped and polished crystal; this is surrounded by a single cell of the same shape, now empty but originally filled with an organic material, probably polished bone. The design is surrounded by a gilded border consisting of a vertical wall with a horizontal ropework flange. On the reverse are the remains of two attachment pins. The cellwork is executed with copper-alloy strips of about 3mm height. Similar decorative cloisonné techniques are used on the composite brooch in the Canterbury St. Martins Hoard, associated with the Frankish princess, Bertha, who married into the Kentish royal family in the late 6th century. Reference: Webster, L. & Backhouse, J. The Making of England. Anglo-Saxon Art and Culture AD 600-900, London, 1991, p.23 item 5(f). Provenance: from an old European collection. Very fine condition.

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Merovingian Frankish 'Cloisonné' Purse Fitting 011731
Anglo-Saxon 'Running Spirals' Saucer Brooch 024140

Anglo-Saxon 'Running Spirals' Saucer Brooch
Gilt copper-alloy, 29.29 grams, 54.42 mm. Circa 5th-6th century AD. A large copper-alloy saucer brooch with chip-carved decoration on the gilded face. The rim is broad and flared, surrounding a flat central plate. The central feature is an inserted iron rivet with a broad head; around this a series of seven chip-carved running spirals with notched upper edges; around this a chamfered ridge surrounded by a series of radiating stamped horseshoe motifs. To the reverse, the pin lugs and remains of the catchplate are in place. Reference: cf. the saucer brooch from Abingdon, Oxfordshire, published in MacGregor, A. & Bolick, E. A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (Non-Ferrous Metals), item 2.7 with similar spiral motif. Near extremely fine condition, gilding mostly intact. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Running Spirals' Saucer Brooch 024140
Anglo-Saxon 'Running Spirals' Saucer Brooch 020258

Anglo-Saxon 'Running Spirals' Saucer Brooch
Copper-alloy, 8.61 grams, 27.30 mm. 5th-6th century AD. A standard Saxon disc brooch with a deep rim and central decorative plate, bearing a design of five running spirals around a central annulet within a pentagonal panel. The catchplate is partly present on the reverse and the pin-lug is encased in mineralised iron from the pin. Reference: MacGregor, A. & Bolick, E. A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (Non-Ferrous Metals), BAR British Series 230, 1993, p.44 item 2.10. Very fine condition, some loss to the rim, some gilding remaining. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Running Spirals' Saucer Brooch 020258
Anglo-Saxon 'Cruciform' Enamelled Disc Brooch 028135

Anglo-Saxon 'Cruciform' Enamelled Disc Brooch
Bronze and enamel, 2.84 grams, 19.34 mm. 10th-11th century AD. A cast bronze disc brooch with expanding arm cruciform motif and white champleve enamel. Fine condition, pin absent. Provenance: ex Penfold collection, discovered 'mudlarking' on Thames foreshore, 1970s-80s.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Cruciform' Enamelled Disc Brooch 028135
Saxon 'Geometric' Bracelet 022613

Saxon 'Geometric' Bracelet
Silver, 7.32 grams, 11.1 cm tip to tip. Circa 6th century AD. A flat-section sheet silver bracelet with tapering ends, decorated on the edges with punched-point roundels. The central row of punched points splits to join the outer rows at each end, and is contained within incised lines with feathered ends. The size of the bracelet (inner diameter maximum 31 mm) indicates that it was intended for a child. Reference: cf. sheet silver bracelet from Barrington A cemetery, Cambridgeshire, in MacGregor, A. & Bolick, E. A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (Non-Ferrous Metals), Oxford, 1993 item 26.13. Very fine condition. Provenance: from an old Thetford collection, acquired in 1981.

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Saxon 'Geometric' Bracelet 022613
Anglo-Saxon Porcupine 'Series E, Variety G1' Continental Sceatta 023913

Anglo-Saxon Porcupine 'Series E, Variety G1' Continental Sceatta
Silver, 1.13 grams, 11.80 mm. Continental, Series E Variant; 695-740 AD. Obverse: finely engraved 'porcupine-like' figure with triangular head and pellets below. Reverse: votive standard with four lines around central annulet. S. 790G; Metcalf p. 200-5, etc. Good very fine, struck in good quality silver.

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Anglo-Saxon Porcupine 'Series E, Variety G1' Continental Sceatta 023913
Anglo-Saxon Primary 'Series CZ' Sceatta 026364

Anglo-Saxon Primary 'Series CZ' Sceatta
Silver, 1.06 grams, 11.67 mm. 680-710 AD. Obverse: profile radiate bust right with runic FMCF before. Reverse: TOTTI standard with large cross pattee at sides. S. 779A; M 132-2, M.p.113. Good very fine.

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Anglo-Saxon Primary 'Series CZ' Sceatta 026364
Anglo-Saxon 'Barleytwist' Tweezers 023175

Superb Anglo-Saxon 'Barleytwist' Tweezers
Copper-alloy, 4.87 grams, 31.20 mm. Circa 6th-10th century AD. A pair of copper-alloy tweezers with broad gripping surfaces and flat shanks. The suspension loop is a separate wire hoop with twisted ends passing through the centre of the tweezers. The shanks are decorated with parallel diagonal lines, the triangular heads with punched-point patterns within lightly incised borders. Reference: West. S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Finds From Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998 fig.45 item 6. Extremely fine condition. Provenance: found East Anglia, UK.
£275.00

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Anglo-Saxon 'Barleytwist' Tweezers 023175
Anglo-Saxon 'Triangular' Tweezers 023024

Superb Anglo-Saxon 'Triangular' Tweezers
Copper-alloy, 4.93 grams, 58.02 mm. Circa 6th century AD. A finely made pair of tweezers with broad gripping edges and D-section shanks. The tweezers are formed from a single metal casting with the separate suspension ring knotted through the upper of the slot. The upper end of each shank is decorated with a transverse-ribbed section above a flat panel with punched ring-and-dot designs - four to one face and five to the other. Close to the lower edge on each face is a group of four punched ring-and-dot motifs. Reference: MacGregor, A. & Bolick, E. A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (Non-Ferrous Metals), Oxford, 1993 item 38.15 and cf. the find from Barham in West. S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Finds From Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998 fig.6 item 51. Extremely fine condition. Provenance: found East Angla, UK.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Triangular' Tweezers 023024
Anglo-Saxon 'Zoomorphic' Cruciform Brooch Finial 028139

Anglo-Saxon 'Zoomorphic' Cruciform Brooch Finial
Bronze, 12.05 grams, 46.87 mm. 10th-11th century AD. A cast bronze cruciform brooch finial with horse-head body and ring-and-dot designs to the nostrils, also converted to ornamental mount with two fixing studs to the reverse. Fine condition, cleaned and conserved. Provenance: ex Penfold collection, discovered 'mudlarking' on Thames foreshore, 1970s-80s.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Zoomorphic' Cruciform Brooch Finial 028139
Merovingian Frankish 'Shield-on-Tongue' Buckle 025446

Merovingian Frankish 'Shield-on-Tongue' Buckle
Silver, 5.66 grams, 28.74 mm. 6th century AD. A small show or strap buckle. The loop is kidney-shaped with scooped underside; the tongue features a stepped rectangle at the base and is curved over the loop. The plate is tongue-shaped with a strap beneath curved over the rear of the loop, secured by a single rivet. Reference: Marzinzik, S. Early Anglo-Saxon Belt Buckles (Late 5th to Early 8th Centuries AD), Oxford, 2003, item 93/2. Very fine condition, complete. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Merovingian Frankish 'Shield-on-Tongue' Buckle 025446
Anglo-Saxon 'Guilloche' Form B12 Wrist Clasp 013478

Anglo-Saxon 'Guilloche' Form B12 Wrist Clasp
Copper-alloy, 4.44 grams, 33.15 mm. 5th-6th century AD. An Anglian wrist clasp of Hines's Form B12, a plate with pierced lugs on the rear edge. The plate has a square panel at each end with an incised border of roundels and a central circular depression. Between these is a recessed panel featuring a series of running spirals in a guilloche pattern. The clasp is the female half of a set, attached to the cuff of a woollen garment worn by one of the female Anglian settlers of the post-Roman period. Reference: Hines, J. Clasps-Hektespenner-Agraffen: Anglo-Scandinavian Clasps of the Third to Sixth Centuries AD. Typology, Diffusion and Function. Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 1993. Very fine condition. Provene: found Northants, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Guilloche' Form B12 Wrist Clasp 013478
Anglo-Saxon 'Ring-and-Dot' Dress Pin 025514

Anglo-Saxon 'Ring-and-Dot' Dress Pin
Copper-alloy, 2.42 grams, 38.29 mm. 5th-6th century AD. A cast dress-pin with discoid head. The shank is round in section, the head is ornamented with a series of ring-and-dot motifs to one face. Reference: Smith, R.A. British Museum Guide to Anglo-Saxon Antiquities reprinted Ipswich, 2005 item 65. Fair condition. Provenance: found near Bridlington, East Yorkshire, UK.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Ring-and-Dot' Dress Pin 025514
Anglo-Saxon 'Insular Knotwork' Mount 022820

Anglo-Saxon 'Insular Knotwork' Mount
Gilt copper-alloy, 6.03 grams, 51.92 mm. Circa 8th century AD. A cast rectangular mount formed as a flat plate decorated with an incised tight knotwork design of the Insular Style seen on manuscripts such as the Lindisfarne Gospels and metalwork such as the Coppergate helmet. The knotwork is surrounded by an eccentric border with a D-shaped indent in the top edge respecting a small hole for a mounting rivet. The heavy gilding is substantially complete and has protected the delicate pattern. The plate was probably original mounted on a piece of ecclesiastical furniture or a standing cross, such as the Rupertus Cross in Pongau, Austria, of Anglo-Saxon workmanship. Subsequently the plate was removed and attached to another item by two large square-section nails; this may be connected with the Viking practice of looting churches and stripping the decorative elements from the holy objects. Reference: cf. details of the Rupertus cross published in Webster, L. & Backhouse, J. The Making of England. Anglo-Saxon Art and Culture, AD 600-900, London, 1991, item 133. Very fine condition, gilding almost complete. Provenance: found East Anglia, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Insular Knotwork' Mount 022820
Anglo-Saxon 'Horned Woden's Head' Applique 022885

Excessively Rare Anglo-Saxon 'Horned Woden's Head' Applique
Copper-alloy, 5.42 grams, 34.89 mm. Circa 6th-7th century AD. A cast copper-alloy applique in the form of a male head with horned headgear. The mount is designed with a piriform face; the eyes are lentoid, the nose covered by the nasal of the headgear, the beard triangular and the ends of the moustache extending beyond the cheeks. The hair is covered by a helmet or mask with hatched texture, extending around the upper face and developing two crescent extensions from the temples which meet above the crown of the head; the terminals are formed as birds' heads and show evidence of gilding. To the reverse, there are three integral attachment pegs. The headgear with bird-head terminals is restricted to the 6th-7th centuries in England although there are parallels from the material culture of both Anglian England and southern Scandinavia at this time. A pair of comparable bird-helmetted human faces can be found on the reconstructed frontal plates on the helmet found in Mound 1 at Sutton Hoo (Suffolk) depicting dancing warriors, and the male face shown on a foil fragment recovered from the barrow at Caenby (Lincolnshire). Similar also is the figure on one of the dies found at Torslunda (Öland, Sweden) showing a male wearing a helmet with a pair of bird-headed horns. A long, triangular male face is shown on the vandyke designs on the foil horn mounts from the barrow at Taplow (Berkshire). A male figure wearing a helmet with horns and bird-head terminals is the central design on a long triangular buckle found in grave 95 at Finglesham (Kent), and also from Finglesham (grave 138) is a mount in the form of a long, triangular human head with vertical radiating bands from the top of the head, and two crescentic horns emerging from the crown, terminating in opposed birds’ heads which meet above. A similar mount was found at Rempstone (Nottinghamshire) and privately published in Raynor (2010) another was found more recently at Attleborough (Norfolk). A mount depicting a similar figure, showing the upper body with hands gripping spears, was published in Hammond (2010). The significance of the headgear has not been fully explored but the coincidence of the birds and the head recall the later myths of Oðinn and his bird messengers, and suggests that these mythic characters were familiar in early Anglo-Saxon England. Reference: Hammond, B. British Artefacts - volume 1. Early Anglo-Saxon, Witham, 2010 item 1.4.5-r, Raynor, K. The Rempstone Mount: Anglo Saxon and Viking Horned Man Images & Artefacts, Nottingham, 2010 and cf. Pestell, T. Paganism in Early Anglo-Saxon East Anglia in Heslop, T.A., Mellings, E.A. and Thofner, M.Icon? Art and Belief in Norfolk from Prehistory to the Present, Woodbridge, in press (2012) figs. 6(a,b). Very fine condition, complete. Provenance: found at Melton, Leicestershire, and recorded with the PAS under reference LEIC-40DB05.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Horned Woden's Head' Applique 022885
Anglo-Saxon 'Zoomorphic' Bronze Strap End 027147

Anglo-Saxon 'Zoomorphic' Bronze Strap End
Bronze, 5.09 grams, 48.10 mm. 9th century AD. A cast bronze strap end with animal head design, with a band of chevrons to the brow. Reference: Thomas, G. Late Anglo-Saxon and Viking-Age Strap Ends 750-1100 - Part 1, Finds Research Group Datasheet 32, 2003. Fine condition. Provenance: ex Hallam collection.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Zoomorphic' Bronze Strap End 027147
Anglo-Saxon 'Class A, Type 4' Strap End 026971

Anglo-Saxon 'Class A, Type 4' Strap End
Copper-alloy, 6.31 grams, 48.82 mm. 9th century AD. A cast convex-sided strap end with split to the rear edge, of Class A, Type 4. The upper edge is pierced in two places. The body is decorated with a rectangular panel of hatching. The finial is a beast-head with three lines of c-shaped punchmarks above. Reference: Thomas, G. Late Anglo-Saxon and Viking-Age Strap-ends 750-1100: Part I, The Finds Research Group AD700-1700, Datasheet 32, Sleaford, 2008. Fine condition. Provenance: found Lincolnshire, UK.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Class A, Type 4' Strap End 026971
Anglo-Saxon 'Beast Head' Strap End 027677B

Anglo-Saxon 'Beast Head' Strap End
Copper-alloy, 7.89 grams, 44.09 mm. 9th century AD. A cast convex-sided strap end with split to the rear edge, of Class A Type 1. The upper edge is pierced twice with palmette detail between, four ornamental panels, three tongue-shaped ears and thickened beast-head finial with triangular brow and annular eyes. The ornamental panels comprise two s-scrolled tendrils and two rectilinear key-patterns. Reference: Thomas, G. Late Anglo-Saxon and Viking-Age Strap-ends 750-1100: Part I, The Finds Research Group AD700-1700, Datasheet 32, Sleaford, 2008. Extremely fine condition, chip to one corner. Provenance: found Lincolnshire, UK.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Beast Head' Strap End 027677B
Anglo-Saxon 'Zoomorphic' Strap End 006121

Anglo-Saxon ’Zoomorphic’ Strap End
Silver, 7.90 grams, 36.25 mm. Circa 9th century AD. An unusual example of an Anglo-Saxon convex-sided strap end. The body of the piece is divided into three fields by transverse lines. The upper field contains two rivet-holes with incised surrounds, with additional lateral lines. The central field features two zones of incised lattice work – none of the incisions extend across the full width of the piece, suggesting that the craftsman worked on one side while holding the piece at the other side, then turned it to work on the other side. The lower field contains a zoomorphic mask with large roundel eyes and incised details. Reference: Webster, L. & Backhouse, J. The Making of England. Anglo-Saxon Art and Culture AD 600-900, London, 1991, p.98 item 69(n). Extremely fine condition. From an old English Collection; ex Mclay Collection.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Zoomorphic' Strap End 006121
Anglo-Saxon 'Triangular' Strap End 024812

Anglo-Saxon 'Triangular' Strap End
Copper-alloy, 3.12 grams, 41.89 mm. 9th century AD. A cast triangular strap end of Class A Type 2 with silver rivet to the upper edge, traces of silvering to the surfaces. Below the rivet holes, there is a palmette and a panel of Trewhiddle Style zoomorphic ornament. The finial is a beast-head with two pelletted lobes for the ears. Reference: Thomas, G. Late Anglo-Saxon and Viking-Age Strap-ends 750-1100: Part I, The Finds Research Group AD700-1700, Datasheet 32, Sleaford, 2008. Fine condition. Provenance: found near Scunthorpe, Lincolnshire, UK.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Triangular' Strap End 024812
Anglo-Saxon 'Style I' Small Square-Headed Brooch 025985

Anglo-Saxon 'Style I' Small Square-Headed Brooch
Gilt copper-alloy, 5.78 grams, 26.40 mm. Circa 6th century AD. A cast small square-headed brooch with stylised beast to the rectangular headplate. The shallow bow bears an incised face within a cartouche. To the reverse are the pin-lugs with ferrous remains of the pin. The face on the bow is an unusual feature, reminiscent of the appliqué faceplates found on disc-on-bow brooches. Reference: MacGregor, A. & Bolick, E. A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (Non-Ferrous Metals), Oxford, 1993 item 14.5. Very fine condition. Provenance: found near Oxford, UK.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Style I' Small Square-Headed Brooch 025985
Anglo-Saxon 'Style I' Florid Cruciform Brooch 016085

Excessively Rare Anglo-Saxon 'Style I' Florid Cruciform Brooch
Copper-alloy, 110 grams, 129.27 mm. Circa 6th century AD. A cruciform brooch of the later 'florid' form with highly decorative openwork border to the headplate. The headplate comprises a rectangular median plate with lateral wings, enhanced with punched-pellet detail to the sides and top edge of each. A raised square panel is placed centrally. In the middle of each edge is placed a Style I human mask in plan, formed as a T-shaped brow-and-nasal with two pellet eyes; from these develop pairs of Style I profile bird-heads with curved beaks. The bow is thick and deep with facetting at each end. The footplate is rectangular with Style I lappets and punched-pellet border; the transverse collar features two rows of punched-pellet detail. The finial is a further Style I human mask with two columns of punched-pellet detail extending to the peltoid terminal. The overall effect is of a triangular band of Style I openwork ornament broken only at the bow and terminal. To the reverse are the pin-lugs, ferrous stain from the pin and base of the catchplate. The staring male face on the footplate with fierce eyes and prominent moustache probably represents a divinity such as the thunder-god, Thunor (later Thor). Reference: published in Hammond, B. British Artefacts vol.1 - Early Anglo-Saxon, Witham, 2010 fig.1.1.4.1-l. Good extremely fine condition. Provenance: found Suffolk, UK.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Style I' Florid Cruciform Brooch 016085
Anglo-Saxon 'Style I' Small-Long Brooch 026725

Anglo-Saxon 'Style I' Small-Long Brooch
Gilt copper-alloy, 7.74 grams, 40.59 mm. 6th century AD. A cast copper-alloy brooch fragment comprising the headplate and bow. The headplate is elliptical with a styled human mask to the central panel, executed in the three-band style of Style I motifs, with the scaphoid mouth element seen on contemporary button brooches. The head is flanked by D-shaped lobes with Y-shaped indents and surmounted by a discoid lobe with beast-head detail. The bow is D-section with deep lateral channels to the outer face. The attachment for the pin-lugs is absent from the reverse. Reference: cf. contemporary Thuringian bow-brooch from Elstertrebnitz published in Menghin, W. The Merovingian Period. Europe Without Borders, Berlin, 2007 items V.1.3.1 and V.2.1.2. Very fine condition, some gilding remaining. Provenance: from an old English collection; acquired in the 1980s.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Style I' Small-Long Brooch 026725
Anglo-Saxon 'Raven Heads' Gold Chip-Carved Pelta Mount 025846

Scarce Anglo-Saxon ‘Raven Heads’ Gold Chip-Carved Pelta Mount
Gilt-Bronze, 9.20 grams, 33.31 mm. 6th-7th century AD. A cast gilt-bronze mount formed as a vertical bar and D-shaped head with zoomorphic terminals; the border billeted enclosing a panel of three-band knotwork; the shoulders terminating in profile raven heads with scrolled beaks; three attachment pins to the reverse. Similar mounts have been found in the contexts of high-status horse bridles e.g. the burial in Mound 17 at Sutton Hoo in Carver, M. Sutton Hoo. A Seventh Century Princely Burial Ground and its Context, fig.110 item 21a. Reference: cf. the pelta mount from Barham, Suffolk in West, S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Finds From Suffolk, fig.7(70). Very fine condition. Provenance: from a Nottinghamshire collection; found near Eyke, Suffolk, UK.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Raven Heads' Gold Chip-Carved Pelta Mount 025846
Anglo-Saxon 'Great Square-Headed' Bow Brooch Fragments 019479

Anglo-Saxon 'Great Square-Headed' Bow Brooch Fragments
Copper-alloy gilt, 2.30/7.23 grams, 24.18/31.73 mm. 5th-6th century AD. Two fragments from a great square-headed brooch. The first is a portion of the footplate complete with one of the lateral lobes and the animal-head element above it, decorated with zoomorphic patterns in the classic three-band Style I format. The second was probably originally part of the headplate, but has been pierced as if the brooch broke in antiquity and the more decorative portions were re-used as pendants; it features a Style I three-band animal. The gilding on both parts is very solid, the surfaces are very detailed and the designs are still clear. Reference: cf. the design of the example from Alveston Manor in Hines, J. A New Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Great Square-Headed Brooches, Woodbridge, 1997 plate 1(b) and Pollington. S., Kerr, L. and Hammond, B. Wayland's Work - Anglo-Saxon Art, Myth and Material Culture from the 4th to the 7th Century, Swaffham, 2010. Very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection, found Stamford Bridge, Yorkshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Great Square-Headed' Bow Brooch Fragments 019479
Anglo-Saxon 'Class A Trewhiddle Style' Strap End 024007B

Anglo-Saxon 'Class A Trewhiddle Style' Strap End
Copper-alloy, 2.84 grams, 28.72 mm. Circa 9th-10th century AD. A cast copper-alloy strap- or tag-end, tongue-shaped with split to the upper end. The upper edge is scrolled to accommodate two pins, still in place, and a palmette motif between. The main design is a recessed panel with reserved motif of two Trewhiddle Style beasts with notched edges to the bodies and interlaced legs. Reference: Thomas, G. Late Anglo-Saxon and Viking-Age Strap Ends 750-1100 - Part 1, Finds Research Group Datasheet 32, 2003. Very fine condition. Provenance: found near Milton Keynes, Bedfordshire, UK.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Class A Trewhiddle Style' Strap End 024007B
Saxon 'Pelleted' Scutiform Pendant 010416

Saxon 'Pelleted' Scutiform Pendant
Silver, 2.83 grams in cardboard sleeve, 23.65 mm. 5th-6th century AD. A delicate sheet silver pendant of classic Anglian form. The central boss is surrounded by six radiating cross-hatched triangular punchmarks; a series of punched pellets is placed around the rim. Scutiform (i.e. 'shield-shaped') pendants were worn as amulets by Germanic women as a means of evoking the protection of their menfolk. Reference: Bruns, D. Germanic Equal Arm Brooches of the Migration Period, BAR Series, London, 2003 and cf. MacGregor, A. & Bolick, E. A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (Non-Ferrous Metals), Oxford, 1993, p.162 items 25.3,4,5. Very fine condition, small part missing. Provenance: from an old English collection, found continental Europe.

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Saxon 'Pelleted' Scutiform Pendant 010416
Saxon 'Polyhedral' Pin Terminal 017113

Saxon ‘Polyhedral’ Pin Terminal
Silver gilt, 2.50 grams, 12.25 mm length. 7th-8th century AD. A finely made terminal to the standard form of hipped pin used in dress fastening, with the gilt intact over much of the surface. The terminal is polyhedral with lozengiform sides and interstitial triangles. Each face is moulded with an inner panel containing degraded residue (perhaps of bone) within a gilded frame. On the upper surface the lozengiform panel contains a reserved floral motif consisting of four conjoined lozenges. The shaft of the pin has a gilt collar. Reference: Webster, L & Backhouse, J. The Making of England. Anglo-Saxon Art and Culture AD 600-900, London, 1991, p.98. fig.69m. Very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection, not found in the UK.

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Saxon 'Polyhedral' Pin Terminal 017113
Late Anglo-Saxon / Viking 'Seven Lobed' Sword Pommel 020527

Late Anglo-Saxon / Viking 'Seven Lobed' Sword Pommel
Copper-alloy, 35.24 grams, 26.96 mm. Circa 10th century AD. A hollow-cast sword pommel formed as five parallel lobes and two horn finials. The central lobe is pierced by a longitudinal circular hole though which the blade's tang passed. The profile is consistent with the curved guards of Petersen's Type L hilts, a form found in Scandinavia (e.g. the Korsøygarde sword) derived from Anglo-Saxon forms (e.g. the Abingdon sword). Reference: Pierce, I. Swords of the Viking Age, Woodbridge, 2004 p.74-6 and Ellis Davidson, H.R. The Sword in Anglo-Saxon England, Woodbridge, 1994; similar to item 1.8.3-e in Hammond, B.British Artefacts, vol.2 - Middle Saxon and Viking, Witham, 2010. Very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection, found Fakenham, Norfolk.

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Late Anglo-Saxon / Viking 'Seven Lobed' Sword Pommel 020527
Anglo-Saxon 'Ribbed' Caterpillar Brooch 010042

Anglo-Saxon 'Ribbed' Caterpillar Brooch
Copper-alloy, 5.18 grams, 43.84 mm. 8th-9th century AD. The caterpillar brooch is a Middle Anglo-Saxon fastener, derived from ansate and equal-arm precursors, used to hold lighter garments such as shawls or linen tunics. This example bears three rectangular transverse bars at the ends and centre of the bow. The catchplate and hinge lugs are partly present. Reference: West, S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Material from Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998, p.128 fig.1. Fine condition.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Ribbed' Caterpillar Brooch 010042
Anglo-Saxon 'Bird-Head Finial' Girdle Hanger 022625

Anglo-Saxon 'Bird-Head Finial' Girdle Hanger
Copper-alloy, 8.70 grams, 36.80 mm. Circa 6th century AD. A cast copper-alloy girdle hanger formed as a rectangular-section bar with T-shaped terminal, the outer ends of which feature bird-head finials which re-join the shaft. The terminal elements are decorated on the outer edges with a stamped motif of three dots within a triangle. The bird-head finials feature the heavy brow-band and elliptical eye found on many pre-Christian Anglo-Saxon high-status artefacts of the 6th and 7th centuries; the beaks curve to form a loop (one lost); bird-heads executed in this level of detail are very unusual on girdle-hangers. Reference: MacGregor, A. and Bolick, E. A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (non-Ferrous Metals), Oxford, 1993 shows many types, although even the most complex (ref.42.7) is not as well-made as the present piece. Fine condition, top of shaft lost in antiquity. Provenance: found Leicestershire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Bird-Head Finial' Girdle Hanger 022625
Anglo-Saxon 'Horse-Head' Bowl Mount 020680

Anglo-Saxon 'Horse-Head' Bowl Mount
Copper-alloy, 33.13 grams, 67.40 mm. 6th-7th century AD. A slightly convex elliptical mount with an integral, cast hook at the top. The surface of the plate is plain with three holes to accept attachment pins, of which one is still present. The cast hook is decorated to resemble a horse-head with notched mane and modelled features including two triangular panels flanking the head. Bowl-mounts of this kind were produced in Ireland, Scotland (Dal Riada and Pictland) and possibly elsewhere in Britain; they often occur in high-status Anglo-Saxon burials (especially burial mounds) of the later 6th and 7th centuries on large hanging bowls and cauldrons, where they probably represent diplomatic gifts or tribute. They continued to be produced in Ireland into the Viking period. Reference: cf. hanging bowl mounts from Akenham, Barham and Ipswich in West. S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Finds From Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998 fig.1.3, 6.59, 69.1. Fine condition. Provenance: found Cambridgeshire, England

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Anglo-Saxon 'Horse-Head' Bowl Mount 020680
Anglo-Saxon 'Latticework' Strap End 015283

Anglo-Saxon 'Latticework' Strap End
Copper-alloy, 4.24 grams, 49.32 mm. 8th-9th century AD. A classic form of Middle Saxon convex-sided strap end, delicate and probably attached to a narrow fabric strap rather than a broad belt. The double-bowed upper edge respects the two circular piercings which held the attachment rivets. Below these is a quadrangular panel with reserved cross-hatched detailing. Two lateral rectangular panels with a crisp divide form the ears of the animal-head terminal. Reference: Webster, L. & Backhouse, J. The Making of England. Anglo-Saxon Art and Culture AD 600-900, London, 1991, p.142 item 107(b) and cf. p.233 items 191-3. Published: Hammond, Brett. British Artefacts, volume 2 - Middle Saxon & Viking, Witham, 2010. Very fine condition. Ex an old American collection.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Latticework' Strap End 015283
Anglo-Saxon 'Latticework' Strap End 018744

Anglo-Saxon 'Latticework' Strap End
Copper-alloy, 2.02 grams, 36.20 mm. 8th-9th century AD. A very delicate Middle Saxon strap end with convex sides. The upper edge is 'scalloped' where the two rivet-holes have broken off. The upper decorative panel is a segmented semicircle; below this is a central zone of heavily-incised cross-hatched decoration flanked by two elliptical panels of lightly-incised lozenges. The lower end features a ribbed collar above a snub-nosed animal head with elliptical lateral panels for the eyes. The strap end is too narrow and light to have been used on a leather strap and may have adorned a fabric braid. Reference: West. S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Finds From Suffolk East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998 p.132 item 2 and p.162 item 9. Good very fine condition. Provenance: found N.E. Lincolnshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Latticework' Strap End 018744
Anglo-Saxon 'Thomas's Class B Type 4' Beast-Head Strap End 020251

Rare Anglo-Saxon 'Thomas's Class B Type 4' Beast-Head Strap End
Copper-alloy, 5.22 grams, 42.84 mm. 8th-9th century AD. A triangular-section strap end terminating in a beast-head finial with triangular ears, ridged brow, and scalloped muzzle. The body is modelled with chevron ribs, rising to a pair of transverse collars. Above is a flat rectangular plate with attachment hole and hatched surface. This form is derived from Thomas's Class B Type 4 with the multi-head feature of that type reduced to multiple ribs. Reference: Thomas, G. Late Anglo-Saxon and Viking-Age Strap Ends 750-1100 - Part 1, Finds Research Group Datasheet 32, 2003. Very fine condition. Provenance: found near Sleaford, Lincolnshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Thomas's Class B Type 4' Beast-Head Strap End 020251
Anglo-Saxon 'Polychrome Sphere' Bead Assemblage 019914

Anglo-Saxon 'Polychrome Sphere' Bead Assemblage
Glass, 42.04 grams as strung, diameter from 4.96 to 26.51 mm. 5th-6th century AD. A group of Anglian beads normally worn on the chest strung between penannular or small-long brooches. The group comprises: one very large dark spherical with irregular combed trails in white, yellow, red, pale blue, brown; twelve small, dark blue irregular globular; four yellow square-section cylindrical; one green globular with trails i dark blue, yellow and orange; one pale blue barrel-shaped with trails in dark blue, yellow and brown. The beads were recovered from the Catterick area (Yorkshire) which is usually identified as the site of the late 6th or early 7th century battle of Catraeth immortalized in the Old Welsh poem Y Gododdin in which a troop of three hundred horsemen from the fortress of Din Eidyn attacked an unnamed but overwhelming enemy force and was wiped out. The case has been made for the British horsemen having set off from the area of modern Edinburgh to attack an Anglian (English) stronghold, although the poem does not mention either the location of the battle or the name of the enemy. Reference: cf. the glass bead forms in Brugmann, B. Glass Beads from Early Anglo-Saxon Graves, Oxford, 2004 and discussion of the poem in Cessford, C. Where are the Anglo-Saxons in the Gododdin poem? in Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History, vol. 8, Oxford, 1995. Extremely fine condition. Provenance: found Catterick, North Yorkshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Polychrome Sphere' Bead Assemblage 019914
Anglo-Saxon 'D-Profile' Buckle 019514

Anglo-Saxon 'D-Profile' Buckle
Copper-alloy, 3.08 grams, 20.44 mm. 10th-11th century AD. A delicate buckle formed as a dished D-shaped loop with thickened disc terminals and a thin rear bar. The tongue is a broad, flat triangle looped around the bar. The outer edge of the loop is decorated with cast linear ornament in a Scandinavian-influenced style. Reference: cf. the earlier Anglo-Saxon buckle from Barrington A, Cambridgeshire in MacGregor, A. & Bolick, E. A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (Non-Ferrous Metals), Oxford, 1993, p.206 item 34.66. Very fine condition. Provenance: found Yorkshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'D-Profile' Buckle 019514
Alemannic 'Openwork Crescent' Buckle 021473

Alemannic 'Openwork' Buckle
Copper-alloy, 22.53 grams, 54.83 mm. 5th-6th century AD. A buckle with loop and plate cast in one. The rectangular loop features a broad front edge with a deep couch for the tongue. From the back edge of the loop develops a waisted panel with transverse rib detailing which is pierced to accept the curved tongue; behind this is the D-shaped plate with scroll- and pelta-shaped piercings. There are lobed projections on the upper, lower and rear edges of the plate, on the reverse of which are three D-shaped lugs (all complete) with transverse piercings to accept a securing pin or wire. The style of the buckle is heavily influenced by contemporary Byzantine fashion, especially in the use of scrolled decoration. Reference: cf. the Lombard buckle from Brianza and the Alemannic example from Gutensteinin Menghin, W. The Merovingian Period. Europe Without Borders, Munich, 2007 p.413 item VI.3.8.2 and p.554 item VIII.11.1. Very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Alemannic 'Openwork Crescent' Buckle 021473
Anglo-Saxon 'Geometric' Hanging Bowl Mount 021484

Extremely Rare Anglo-Saxon 'Geometric' Hanging Bowl Mount
Copper-alloy, 16.40 grams, 38.0 mm diameter. Circa 6th-7th century AD. A convex disc with geometric ornament in champ levee technique, forming the central motif of a hanging bowl mount (the frame and hook missing). The motif is a repeated ellipsis forming six-petalled flowers across the surface. The background texture suggests a red or pink enamel field, with the design reserved against this. Reference: cf. similar plate (but with La Tène design) in West. S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Finds From Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998, p.122 item 59. Very fine condition. Provenance: found Thetford, Norfolk, 1991.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Geometric' Hanging Bowl Mount 021484
Anglo-Saxon 'Knotwork' Mount 022094

Anglo-Saxon 'Knotwork' Mount
Gilt copper-alloy, 12.18 grams, 31.19 mm. Circa 7th century AD. A cast disc mount formed with a broad thickened rim, flat field and central boss. The inner face of the rim and outer face of the boss are beaded. The field bears a three-line knotwork design. On the reverse are soldering scars indicating that the mount had been re-used as a disc brooch. The gilding is heavy and mostly present. Reference: cf. Hammond, B. British Artefacts vol.2 - Middle Saxon and Viking, Witham, 2010 item 1.6-c (ungilded). Very fine condition. Provenance: found Suffolk, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Knotwork' Mount 022094
Anglo-Saxon 'Ansate' Brooch 018116

Anglo-Saxon 'Ansate' Brooch
Copper-alloy, 7.33 grams, 39.61 mm. 8th-9th century AD. The ansate brooch was the Middle Saxon development of the Germanic equal-arm brooch, consisting of a bow joining two end plates with similar decoration. The present example comprises two lobed discs bearing three ring-and-dot designs flanking a shallow bow with ring-and-dot on the outer ends and ribbed detailing in the middle. On the reverse the catchplate and pin-lugs are intact with ferrous residue from the pin still in place. Reference: Hattatt, R. Ancient Brooches and Other Artefacts, Oxford, 1989, item 1684 and West. S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Finds From Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998 p.216 fig.3. Published: Hammond, Brett. British Artefacts, volume 2 - Middle Saxon & Viking, Witham, 2010. Good very fine condition. Provenance: found Wiltshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Ansate' Brooch 018116
Anglo-Saxon 'Openwork' Disc Brooch 022416

Very Rare Anglo-Saxon 'Openwork' Disc Brooch
Copper-alloy, 11.76 grams, 39.51 mm. Circa 5th-6th century AD. A cast disc brooch with rectangular extensions at the quarters, crescent voids around the centre and five ring-and-dot motifs. The catchplate and pin-lug are partly present on the reverse. Anglian openwork disc brooches were normally worn in pairs at the shoulder to secure the peplos-style garment. Reference: cf. very similar brooches found at Haslingfield, Cambridgeshire, in MacGregor, A. and Bolick, E. A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (non-Ferrous Metals), Oxford, 1993 item 5.3. Extremely fine condition. Provenance: found Norfolk, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Openwork' Disc Brooch 022416
Saxon 'Bifacial Filigree' Pendant 018974

Very Rare Saxon 'Bifacial Filigree' Pendant
Gold, 1.32 grams, 11.59 mm. 6th-7th century AD. A hollow fabricated pendant comprising a discoid plate with central knop within an annulet. The edge is decorated with granulation. On the other face the discoid plate bears three arcs and a central knop, also with granulation round the edge. The two plates are supported by a rim, also bearing a line of granulation, from which develops the filigree wire suspension loop. Reference: MacGregor, A. & Bolick, E. A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (Non-Ferrous Metals), Oxford, 1993, p.162 item 25.3 (pendant) and cf. West. S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Finds From Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998 p.127 fig.3. Very fine condition. Provenance: found continental Europe.

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Saxon 'Bifacial Filigree' Pendant 018974
Anglo-Saxon 'Woden Head and Birds' Sword Chape Mount 020664

Very Rare Anglo-Saxon 'Woden Head and Birds' Sword Chape Mount
Copper-alloy, 5.77 grams, 29.42 mm. Circa 5th century AD. A cast facing mount from the chape of an early Anglo-Saxon sword, in the form of a male face with staring eyes, triangular cap, T-shaped nose-and-brow element, full beard developing into an opposed pair of bird heads which flank the face. Below the beard is a column which originally closed around the lower edge of the chape forming a protective plate. This class of fittings is found around the North Sea rim in Germany (e.g. Krefeld-Gellep), Belgium (e.g. Namur) and England (e.g. Abingdon); it is known as the 'Samson Type' after an early findspot (Samson, Namur, Belgium). The symbolism of the bearded head flanked by birds is reminiscent of the god Woden, whose Scandinavian counterpart Odin is associated with two ravens, Huginn and Muninn, who whisper news into his ears. Reference: Menghin, W. Das Schwert im Frühen Mittelalter, Stuttgart. 1983, p.351. Good very fine condition. Provenance: Found Sproxton, Leicestershire, England and recorded with the PAS under reference LEIC-7F2E18, published in the 2006 Annual Treasure Report and supplied with full documentation.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Woden Head and Birds' Sword Chape Mount 020664
Anglo-Saxon 'Style I' Buckle Loop 009020

Extremely Rare Anglo-Saxon 'Style I' Buckle Loop
Copper-alloy, 2.26 grams, 19.12 mm. Late 6th-7th century AD. This piece is an interesting example of a fragment of a high-status buckle-loop. The bar for the hinge is present, as well as part of the couched recess for the tongue. The loop is bordered by a raised rim, containing chip-carved zoomorphic decoration is Style I. While decorated plates are a fairly common Anglo-Saxon feature, decoration on the loop (other than geometric segmentation) is very rare and confined to the very highest quality pieces such as the examples from Taplow, Alton and Sutton Hoo. Reference: Marzinzik, S. Early Anglo-Saxon Belt Buckles (Late 5th to Early 8th Centuries A.D.). Their Classification and Context BAR British Series 357, Oxford, 2003. Published: Hammond, Brett. British Artefacts, volume I - Early Anglo-Saxon. Extremely Rare. Provenance: found Norfolk.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Style I' Buckle Loop 009020
Saxon 'Looped' Finger Ring 015156

Saxon 'Looped' Finger Ring
Gold, 5.15 grams, 22.31 mm ext.dia. (British size P, USA 7¾, Europe 16.45). 6th-8th century AD. A plain, flat-section hoop of about 1.5 mm thickness, the pointed ends looped over the hoop to close it. Reference: cf. rings from Eriswell, Suffolk, in West S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Material from Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998 p.148 items 8,9. Extremely fine condition, some restoration. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Saxon 'Looped' Finger Ring 015156
Anglo-Saxon 'Ring-and-Dot' Dress Pin 020496

Anglo-Saxon 'Ring-and-Dot' Dress Pin
Copper-alloy, 3.84 grams, 43.90 mm. 6th-7th century AD. A cast dress pin with round-section shaft and polyhedral head, the broader faces with four ring-and-dot motifs and the narrower ones with just one. Reference: Webster, L. and Backhouse, J. The Making of England. Anglo-Saxon Art and Culture AD 600-900, London, 1991, item 66j,k. Fine condition. Provenance: found Derbyshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Ring-and-Dot' Dress Pin 020496
Anglo-Saxon 'Group 1.2 Carinated' Shield Boss 021424

Anglo-Saxon 'Group 1.2 Carinated' Shield Boss
Iron, 370 grams, 115 mm diameter. Circa 6th century AD. A forged shield boss of Group 1.2 with a low, flat cone and very sharp carination onto the sidewall. Shieldbosses of this type are a notable feature of the Upper Thames and Wessex regions, where it was in use over many generations. Reference: Dickinson, T. and Härke, Early Anglo-Saxon Shields, Archaeologia vol.110, London, 1992 p.10-13. Fair condition, sidewall and flange missing. Provenance: found Wiltshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Group 1.2 Carinated' Shield Boss 021424
Anglo-Saxon 'Opposed Beasts' Penannular Mount 020495

Anglo-Saxon 'Opposed Beasts' Penannular Mount
Copper-alloy, 8.68 grams, 22.56 mm. 8th-10th century AD. A cast mount of ovoid section comprising a penannular bar with beast-head terminals; from each mouth extends a small lug. The heads are formed with ears laid flat on the neck, ovoid eyes and scalloped muzzle; stylistically they resemble the animal-heads on the sword-chapes from St. Ninian's Isle, Scotland, of early 8th century date. The small lugs suggest that the piece was mounted to swing freely, perhaps as a strap attachment loop. Reference: Webster, L. and Backhouse, J. The Making of England. Anglo-Saxon Art and Culture AD 600-900, London, 1991, items 178a, b. Very fine condition, complete. Provenance: found near Glossop, Derbyshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Opposed Beasts' Penannular Mount 020495
Anglo-Saxon 'Garnet Cloison' Sword Pyramid 020676

Anglo-Saxon 'Garnet Cloison' Sword Pyramid
Silver-gilt, 1.07 grams, 12.86 mm. 6th-7th century AD. A delicate and finely-made fitting, intended to slide on a strap, thong or textile band securing a sword. The piece is hollow-cast in silver, with a flat-section bar across the void. The sides are decorated with reserved V-shaped elements against the chip-carved gilded triangles. The apex is a flat cloison panel into which has been set a square garnet, with a 'chequered' foil behind to give additional reflectivity and sparkle. Sword pyramids are a short-lived fashion of the later 6th and early 7th century where they functioned as 'sliders' in the suspension of the sword, perhaps for the 'peace-bands' which later sources mention in connection with the rituals of military power. The small size is not uncommon on certain classes of sword pyramid, perhaps reflecting use on a narrow textile strap rather than a leather thong. The fracture offers an excellent opportunity to study the construction of these items. Reference: cf. the similarly decorated but larger example from Barham, Suffolk in West. S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Finds From Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998 p.121 fig.48. Very fine condition, crisp and almost complete. Provenance: from an old English collection formed in the 1960's.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Garnet Cloison' Sword Pyramid 020676
Anglo-Saxon 'Collared' Caterpillar Brooch 018697

Large Anglo-Saxon 'Collared' Caterpillar Brooch
Copper-alloy, 15.54 grams, 59.07 mm. 8th-9th century AD. A heavy cast caterpillar brooch of unusually large size and robustness. The body of the brooch is a carinated D-section bar with five sets of transverse collars, that on the apex of the bow being doubled. The terminals are wedge-shaped and suggest animals heads. The pin-lugs and catchplate are in place on the reverse. A similar brooch was found at Bromeswell (Suffolk). To be published in the forthcoming title British Artefacts, volume 2 - Middle Saxon & Viking, due mid-2010. Reference: West, S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Material from Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998, p.13 and fig 12(1). Very fine condition. Provenance: found Norfolk, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Collared' Caterpillar Brooch 018697
Anglo-Saxon 'Ring-and-Dot' Ansate Brooch 019339

Anglo-Saxon 'Ring-and-Dot' Ansate Brooch
Copper-alloy, 5.50 grams, 46.14 mm. 8th-9th century AD. The ansate brooch was a Middle Saxon development of the Germanic equal-arm brooch, consisting of a bow joining two symmetrical end plates with similar decoration. The present example comprises two rhomboid plates with dagged outer edges joined by a shallow bow. The decoration comprises a cluster of ring-and-dot designs next to the bow with a further central pair extending to the outer edge and a single example on the bow. On the reverse the catchplate is complete and in place; the pin lug was broken in antiquity. Reference: cf. West. S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Finds From Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998 p.119 fig.3, p.128 fig.3and p.216. Published: Hammond, Brett. British Artefacts, volume 2 - Middle Saxon & Viking, Witham, 2010. Extremely fine condition. Provenance: found Hampshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Ring-and-Dot' Ansate Brooch 019339
Saxon 'Trewhiddle Style' Pyramid Mount 021447

Extremely Rare Saxon 'Trewhiddle Style' Pyramid Mount
Silver-gilt, 1.38 grams, 9.82 mm. 9th-10th century AD. A hollow-cast mount, pierced on the top surface. Each trapezoidal side face bears a zoomorph: sides (1) and (3) display a round-headed beast with its tail in its mouth, side (2) shows a beast with its mouth agape and rounded chest, side (4) shows a beast inverted with a simple knot pattern for its body. The piece is richly decorated on such a small scale and must have been part of a very high-status object, perhaps an item of liturgical silverware. Reference: cf. Trewhiddle Style beast on the Selkirk finger ring in Webster, L. and Backhouse, J. The Making of England: Anglo-Saxon Art and Culture AD 600-900, London, 1991 item 203. Good very fine condition. Provenance: from an old collection.

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Saxon 'Trewhiddle Style' Pyramid Mount 021447
Anglo-Saxon 'Hipped' Dress Pin 021333

Anglo-Saxon 'Hipped' Dress Pin
Copper-alloy, 5.30 grams, 66.03 mm. 5th-7th century AD. A decorative dress pin comprising a pointed cylindrical shaft with a slight bulb above the point. At the top a narrow collar supports the spherical head, decorated with incised ring-and-dot motifs. Reference: Webster, L & Backhouse, J. The Making of England. Anglo-Saxon Art and Culture AD 600-900, London, 1991, p.85 fig.66j. Extremely fine condition. Provenance: found North Essex, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Hipped' Dress Pin 021333
Anglo-Saxon 'Trewhiddle Style' Book Mount 020353

Anglo-Saxon 'Trewhiddle Style' Book Mount
Silver, 7.30 grams, 31.34 mm. 9th century AD. A silver plate with cast pelleted border, its main surface divided into two panels with a pelleted border between. The decorative motifs are segmented zoomorphs in Trewhiddle Style with interlaced tendrils. The upper edge of the piece shows the pelleted border design and evidence for two circular piercings, one in the corner and another centrally near the upper edge; two circular holes are placed near the lower corners. Reference: cf. Trewhiddle hoard in Wilson, D.M. Anglo-Saxon Ornamental Metalwork 700-1100 in the British Museum, London, 1964 p.184ff. Very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection formed in the 1980's.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Trewhiddle Style' Book Mount 020353
Anglo-Saxon 'Roundels' Disc Brooch 018876

Anglo-Saxon 'Roundels' Disc Brooch
Copper-alloy, 9.43 grams, 34.36 mm. 5th-6th century AD. A cast disc brooch with incised concentric circle decoration containing punched pellet details: four in the central ring, sixteen in the middle and seven visible (previously eight?) in the outer ring. There are traces of gilding and enamel within the pellets. There is a central perforation; the pin lug and catchplate are present on the reverse. Disc brooches are a unique Anglo-Saxon fastener type without continental parallels, occurring mostly in the southern part of England and especially the upper Thames Valley. Reference: MacGregor, A. & Bolick, E. A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (Non-Ferrous Metals), BAR British Series 230, 1993, p.63 item 4.32. Very fine condition. Provenance: found Kent, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Roundels' Disc Brooch 018876
Anglo-Saxon 'Segmented' Bracelet 019422

Anglo-Saxon 'Segmented' Bracelet
Copper-alloy, 33.99 grams, 64.66 mm. 5th-7th century AD. A substantial cast bracelet, its surface divided into decorative zones by panels of transverse ribbing. Three larger panels are facetted and decorated with three roes of fine ring-and-dot punchmarks; four smaller panels are almost circular and similarly decorated, the outer ones extending to terminals with longitudinal ribbing. Reference: cf. segmented bracelet with punched-dot decoration from Ixworth in West, S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Material from Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology, Ipswich, 1998, p.220 item 5. Good fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection, found Stamford Bridge, Yorkshire.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Segmented' Bracelet 019422
Anglo-Saxon 'Biconical' Bowl 020410

Anglo-Saxon 'Biconical' Bowl
Ceramic, 620 grams, 110 mm. 5th-7th century. A wheel-thrown biconical bowl or jar in a dark brown fabric with micaceous temper and some burnishing. The vessel lacks the decorative rouletting which is most commonly found on wheel-thrown bowls from Anglo-Saxon grave contexts, but it does feature horizontal scoring on the shoulder. A very similar vessel was recovered from Sarre, Kent and published by Evison. The high-status cemetery at Prittlewell had close links with the area of Canterbury and eastern Kent. Reference: Evison, V.I. Wheel-Thrown Pottery in Anglo-Saxon Graves, Royal Archaeological Institute, London, 1979 p.77 and 14(b). Good condition, some fractures repaired; almost complete. Provenance: found Prittlewell, Essex, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Biconical' Bowl 020410
Anglo-Saxon 'Bird-Heads' Gusset Plate 020442

Rare Anglo-Saxon 'Bird-Heads' Gusset Plate
Gilt copper-alloy, 4.72 grams, 29.17 mm. 5th-6th century AD. A cast plate from a three-part wrist-clasp set, attached at the apex of the triangular slit and intended to prevent the fabric tearing in constant use. Gusset plates are found in some numbers across eastern England (and in Norway) but are rare elsewhere. The plate comprises an upper disc with a reserved dot at the centre; from either side of this extend two bars which form bird-head terminals whose beaks recurve to meet the bars. A small curved bar is placed between the rear of the heads. The present example is the lower portion of a larger piece formed with an elongated triangle above the circular feature. The paired bird-heads are a traditional feature of Migration Period art which reflects aspects of the religious climate of the age: a pair of birds later came to be associated with Oðinn (Odin) the Norse god of war and magic. Reference: Hines, J. Clasps-Hektespenner-Agraffen: Anglo-Scandinavian Clasps of the Third to Sixth Centuries AD. Typology, Diffusion and Function. Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 1993, p.73. Good very fine condition. Provenance: found Essex, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Bird-Heads' Gusset Plate 020442
Merovingian Period Avar 'Scrollwork' Belt Set 013577

Merovingian Period Avar 'Scrollwork' Belt Set
Silver, total weight 24.88 grams, typical length of studs: 17.30 mm. 5th-6th century AD. A decorative belt-set comprising nine studs and a pentagonal plate. The studs are heart-shaped and bear a raised cast design comprising two outer loops joining to enclose a central heart on a beaded background; a vertical ridge splits at each end to complete the outer border. A short mounting rivet is in place on the reverse of five of the studs. The plate is decorated with a raised T-shaped panel extending to the edges at the top, bottom and two points on the sides; between these are beaded panels. The central section features an ovoid recess with central beaded detailing. Two attachment pins are in place on the reverse. The set comprises most of the fittings from a wealthy male's belt (missing the buckle and strap end). The workmanship is of good quality and the design is typical of the Avar passion for scrolled linear decoration. Reference: cf. Avar belt fittings published in Menghin, W. The Merovingian Period. Europe Without Borders, p.339. Good very fine condition. Provenance: from an old collection, found Continental Europe.

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Merovingian Period Avar 'Scrollwork' Belt Set 013577
Anglo-Saxon 'Lobed' Cross Brooch 018878

Anglo-Saxon 'Lobed' Cross Brooch
Copper-alloy, 12.37 grams, 38.12 mm. 6th-8th century AD. An unusual form of Anglo-Saxon cross brooch formed as a central lobe with ring-and-dot motif surrounded by four lobed arms, each bearing a ring-and-dot motif. The pin-lugs and catchplate are present on the reverse. Cross brooches were in use in the pre-Christian period where they probably represent a simplified form of the brooch-type comprising four animal-heads; they appear to have continued in use into the Christian Middle Saxon period. Reference: MacGregor, A. & Bolick, E. A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (Non-Ferrous Metals), BAR British Series 230, 1993, p.153 item 20.2. Published: Hammond, Brett. British Artefacts, volume 2 - Middle Saxon & Viking, Witham, 2010. Very fine condition. Provenance: found Dorset, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Lobed' Cross Brooch 018878
Late Saxon / Anglo-Scandinavian 'Lobed Cross' Disc Brooch 019906

Viking / Anglo-Scandinavian 'Lobed Cross' Disc Brooch
Copper-alloy and enamel, 4.91 grams, 24.18 mm. 10th-11th century AD. A classic form of Late Saxon or Anglo-Scandinavian disc brooch comprising a central enamel panel surrounded by radiating knops (two remaining) filled with enamel cabochons (one remaining). The central panel is a dark blue enamel background with an inset cross formed from four elongated lobes in pale blue enamel. The pin-lug and attachment point for the catchplate are in place on the reverse. Reference: West. S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Finds From Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998 p.121 fig.48. Good fine condition. Provenance: found Lincolnshire, England.

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Late Saxon / Anglo-Scandinavian 'Lobed Cross' Disc Brooch 019906
Anglo-Saxon 'Trefoil-Headed' Small-Long Brooch 017039

Anglo-Saxon ‘Trefoil-Headed’ Small-Long Brooch
Copper-alloy, 12.28 grams, 62.07 mm. 5th-6th century AD. A good example of the small-long brooch type. The rectangular headplate is pierced at each stepped corner to form three T-shaped components similar to the trefoil pattern of some cruciform brooches. The carinated bow is facetted at both ends and develops into a narrow footplate with expanding terminal. A transverse collar is formed from two ribbed transverse bands. The finial is a thickened band with segmented decoration. The spring-lug bears remains of the iron pin; the catchplate is complete. Reference: MacGregor, A. & Bolick, E. A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (Non-Ferrous Metals), Oxford, 1993, p.135 item 15.43. Good fine condition. Provenance: found Winchester, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Trefoil-Headed' Small-Long Brooch 017039
Anglo-Saxon 'Small-Long' Bow Brooch 021328

Rare Anglo-Saxon 'Small-Long' Bow Brooch
Copper-alloy, 10.28 grams, 50.47 mm. Circa 6th century AD. A bow brooch with square heaplate bearing an incised saltire, with a trapezoidal extension above and crimped discoid lobes to each side. The bow is carinated, bisected horizontally by a groove, very flat on the underside. The footplate is triangular with an incised saltire below the bow, crimped discoid lobes flanking, transverse ribbing and a crimped discoid finial. The pin-lug is in place on the reverse and the catchplate is in a block of ferrous accretion, the remains of the pin. The small-long group is very amorphous, characterised by its small size, shallow bow and simple decoration. Reference: Hattatt, R. Iron Age and Roman Brooches, Oxford, 1985 items 672-7. Very fine condition. Provenance: found Harston, Cambridgeshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Small-Long' Bow Brooch 021328
Anglo-Saxon 'Glass, Amber and Crystal' Bead Assemblage 019915

Anglo-Saxon 'Glass, Amber and Crystal' Bead Assemblage
Glass, amber and crystal, 39.67 grams as strung, diameter from 5.65 to 16.32 mm. 5th-6th century AD. A group of Anglian beads normally worn on the chest strung between penannular or small-long brooches. The group comprises: one large, dark blue barrel-shaped with orange trail; two dark blue annular with yellow, white, red and pale blue trails; one dark brown asymmetrical barrel-shaped 11-ribbed melon; one crystal discoid; one dark blue ribbed discoid; one dark brown ribbed discoid; two dark blue globular with irregular pale blue dots; four dark blue asymmetrical globular; one pale blue translucent globular with attachment point for an applied knop; two translucent green discoid; two small dark blue ribbed globular; one barrel shaped amber globular; four small irregular amber; one dark green annular with attachment point for an applied knop; one translucent pale green annular; one dark blue globular with attachment points for two knops; one translucent brown ribbed annular; one black and brown asymmetrical globular. The beads were recovered from the Catterick area (Yorkshire) which is usually identified as the site of the late 6th or early 7th century battle of Catraeth immortalized in the Old Welsh poem Y Gododdin in which a troop of three hundred horsemen from the fortress of Din Eidyn attacked an unnamed but overwhelming enemy force and was wiped out. The case has been made for the British horsemen having set off from the area of modern Edinburgh to attack an Anglian (English) stronghold, although the poem does not mention either the location of the battle or the name of the enemy. Reference: cf. the glass bead forms in Brugmann, B. Glass Beads from Early Anglo-Saxon Graves, Oxford, 2004 and discussion of the poem in Cessford, C. Where are the Anglo-Saxons in the Gododdin poem? in Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History, vol. 8, Oxford, 1995. Extremely fine condition. Provenance: found Catterick, North Yorkshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Glass, Amber and Crystal' Bead Assemblage 019915
Anglo-Saxon 'Ring-Bound' Toilet Set 017648

Anglo-Saxon ‘Ring-Bound’ Toilet Set
Copper-alloy, 6.86 grams, 99.75 mm. 5th-7th century AD. An unusual set of early Anglo-Saxon toilet implements, complete with their suspension ring. The first implement is a pointed rod about 82 mm long with a slight thickening above the point. The second is a rod of about 62mm length with a small dished section at the lower end. The third is a longer pointed rod of about 89 mm. Sets such as these were often used for keeping the body clean and well-appointed, for cleaning the nails and ears, and the spoon could be used for measuring tiny amounts of cosmetic substances. However, the lack of tweezers may indicate that this particular set was intended for medical rather than cosmetic purposes, the pointed rods heated and used for lancing boils and as picks while the spoon was used to control the quantities of active substances such as belladonna (called in Old English solsece) or foxglove (foxes clife). The twisted wire suspension ring is breached but otherwise complete. Reference: cf. the silver set in Webster, L. & Backhouse, J. The Making of England. Anglo-Saxon Art and Culture AD 600-900, London, 1991, p.52 item 33(g) and Pollington, S. Leechcraft - Early English Charms, Plantlore and Healing, Swaffham, 2008. Very fine condition. Provenance: found Norfolk.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Ring-Bound' Toilet Set 017648
Anglo-Saxon 'Biting Beast with Silver Eyes' Seax Pommel Cap 019909

Rare Anglo-Saxon 'Biting Beast with Silver Eyes' Seax Pommel Cap
Copper-alloy, 11.07 grams, 35.62 mm. 8th-9th century AD. A hollow scaphoid mount, the elliptical body pierced with a rivet-hole. The lower body is square and featureless; from the upper end emerges the thin, curved neck of a zoomorph whose subtriangular, bulbous head is attached to its chest. The snout is provided with bulbous nostrils and the ears are concave discs on the sides of the head. The eyes are formed as spherical silver granules. Stylistically, the beast-head is similar to several Middle Saxon examples such as those on the gold finger ring from Dorset (again with inset eyes). The shape of the mount suggests that it may have been a pommel cap, but the delicate neck of the beast would be unsuitable for any kind of weapon or utilitarian knife. Reference: Hinton, D.A. Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Ornamental Metalwork 700-1100 in the Department of Antiquities, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, 1974, p.16-7 item 8 and plateVI. Very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Biting Beast with Silver Eyes' Seax Pommel Cap 019909
Anglo-Saxon 'Round Bow' Casket Key 020535

Anglo-Saxon 'Round Bow' Casket Key
Copper-alloy, 11.22 grams, 47.20 mm. 10th-11th century AD. A neat cast key comprising a discoid bow with integral suspension loop developing into a circular shaft with a locating hole in the forward end, and a toothed left edge to the bit. The key is made for right-handed operation with clockwise rotation. reference: cf. voided-bow key from Barham in West, S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Material From Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998 pl.6 no.58. Extremely fine condition. Provenance: found Saxmundham, Suffolk, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Round Bow' Casket Key 020535
Anglo-Saxon 'Type II.19b' Buckle 019110

Anglo-Saxon 'Type II.19b' Buckle
Silvered copper-alloy, 2.86 grams, 24.28 mm. 5th-6th century AD. A cast buckle with integral plate of Marzinzik's Type II.19b, with its tongue inserted through a circular hole in the forward edge of the plate. A single rivet pierces the plate, and the rear edge has fragmented where two holes were placed. The buckle was recovered from the Catterick area (Yorkshire) which is usually identified as the site of the late 6th or early 7th century battle of Catraeth immortalized in the Old Welsh poem Y Gododdin in which a troop of three hundred horsemen from the fortress of Din Eidyn attacked an unnamed but overwhelming enemy force and was wiped out. The case has been made for the British horsemen having set off from the area of modern Edinburgh to attack an Anglian (English) stronghold, although the poem does not mention either the location of the battle or the name of the enemy. Reference: cf. example from Catterick racecourse in Marzinzik, S. Early Anglo-Saxon Belt Buckles (Late 5th to Early 8th Centuries AD). Their Classification and Context, BAR British Series 357, Oxford, 2003 pl.110 item 2 and discussion of the poem in Cessford, C. Where are the Anglo-Saxons in the Gododdin poem? in Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History, vol. 8, Oxford, 1995. Very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection, found Catterick, Yorkshire.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Type II.19b' Buckle 019110
Anglo-Saxon 'Dished' Buckle 019152

Anglo-Saxon 'Dished' Buckle
Copper-alloy, 5.14 grams, 34.17 mm. 6th century AD. A cast D-shaped buckle of dished profile, with heavy ribbed detailing. The tongue is flat in section and curved over the front edge of the buckle loop. The fold rectangular plate has a double border of punched-dot decoration surrounding the central rivet hole. Similar to a pair of buckles from the Barrington (Cambridge) cemetery. Reference: MacGregor, A. & Bolick, E. A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (Non-Ferrous Metals) BAR British Series 230, 1993, pp.203 item 34.41. Good very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Dished' Buckle 019152
Anglo-Saxon 'Form B20' Punched-Edged Wrist Clasp 017023

Anglo-Saxon ‘Form B20 Punched-Edged’ Wrist Clasp
Copper-alloy, 4.76 grams, 33.67 mm. 5th-6th century AD. An Anglian wrist clasp of Hines's Form B20, its plate bears five lugs, the outer two pierced for attachment to the cuff of a female's shift. The plate has a vertical bar, stepped and with delicate punched decoration on the lower edge, and two rectangular panels are decorated with transverse banding. The outer edges of the lugs are decorated with very fine punched roundel decoration. The catchplate attachment points are visible but the cast plate was lost in antiquity. Wrist clasps were a long-lived fashion among Anglian women, used in pairs to close the cuffs of their long-sleeved shifts. Reference: Hines, J. Clasps-Hektespenner-Agraffen: Anglo-Scandinavian Clasps of the Third to Sixth Centuries AD. Typology, Diffusion and Function. Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 1993, p.64-5. Extremely fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection, found Cambridgeshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Form B20' Punched-Edged Wrist Clasp 017023
Anglo-Saxon 'Form B20 Scalloped' Wrist Clasp 017022

Anglo-Saxon ‘Form B20 Scalloped' Wrist Clasp
Copper-alloy, 4.99 grams, 37.85 mm. 5th-6th century AD. An Anglian wrist clasp of Hines's Form B20, its plate bears four lugs on the back edge, all pierced for attachment to the cuff of a female's shift. The plate has a vertical bar with two rectangular panels decorated with transverse banding. The hook is still in place on the reverse. Wrist clasps were a long-lived fashion among Anglian women, used in pairs to close the cuffs of their long-sleeved shifts. Reference: Hines, J. Clasps-Hektespenner-Agraffen: Anglo-Scandinavian Clasps of the Third to Sixth Centuries AD. Typology, Diffusion and Function. Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 1993, p.64-5. Good very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection, found Cambridgeshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Form B20 Scalloped' Wrist Clasp 017022
Anglo-Saxon 'Spiral Filigree' Zoomorphic Strap End 015000

Anglo-Saxon 'Spiral Filigree' Zoomorphic Strap End
Copper-alloy, 4.22 grams, 35.01 mm. 8th century AD. A finely-made strap-end of split-end construction. The upper edge is formed as three lobes, the central one being pierced for the attachment rivet. The upper zone consists of three triangular fields, two bearing substantial remains of filigree and niello inlay in a complex spiral pattern; the third has vestigial remains of a similar infill. Beneath this is a pair of spiral-filled sub-circular motifs representing the beast’s ears, and below this is a sub-triangular nasal panel with flanking roundels (the eyes). The nasal is decorated with a panel of s-scroll filigree. The decoration is typical of the 8th c. Anglo-Saxon Insular Style, found for example on the Coppergate helmet. Reference: Smith, R.A. British Museum Guide to Anglo-Saxon Antiquities, London, 1923, p.107, fig.131 and Webster, L & Backhouse, J. The Making of England. Anglo-Saxon Art and Culture AD 600-900, London, 1991, p.60-2 fig.47 (detail). Very fine condition.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Spiral Filigree' Zoomorphic Strap End 015000
Anglo-Saxon 'Glass, Amber and Crystal' Bead Assemblage 019916

Anglo-Saxon 'Glass, Amber and Crystal' Bead Assemblage
Glass, amber and crystal, 12.05 grams as strung, diameter from 7.40 to 16.22 mm. 5th-6th century AD. A group of Anglian beads normally worn on the chest strung between penannular or small-long brooches. The group comprises: one large red spherical with white crossing waves; two crystal discoids; one pale blue barrel-shaped with circumferential dots; one pale blue globular; one small red annular; one small amber annular. The beads were recovered from the Catterick area (Yorkshire) which is usually identified as the site of the late 6th or early 7th century battle of Catraeth immortalized in the Old Welsh poem Y Gododdin in which a troop of three hundred horsemen from the fortress of Din Eidyn attacked an unnamed but overwhelming enemy force and was wiped out. The case has been made for the British horsemen having set off from the area of modern Edinburgh to attack an Anglian (English) stronghold, although the poem does not mention either the location of the battle or the name of the enemy. Reference: cf. the glass bead forms in Brugmann, B. Glass Beads from Early Anglo-Saxon Graves, Oxford, 2004 and discussion of the poem in Cessford, C. Where are the Anglo-Saxons in the Gododdin poem? in Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History, vol. 8, Oxford, 1995. Extremely fine condition. Provenance: found Catterick, North Yorkshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Glass, Amber and Crystal' Bead Assemblage 019916
Anglo-Saxon 'Biconical' Glass Bead 019920

Anglo-Saxon 'Biconical' Glass Bead
Glass, 3.83 grams, 16.27 mm. 5th-7th century AD. A heavy bead in dark blue glass, biconical in profile with a light blue circumferential zigzag trail. The use of larger sizes and darker glass is associated with Germanic rather than Roman production (Brugmann, p.28). Reference: Brugmann, B. Glass Beads from Early Anglo-Saxon Graves, Oxford, 2004. Very fine condition, some chipping to the surface. Provenance: from an old English collection, found Wigan, Lancashire.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Biconical' Glass Bead 019920
Thuringian 'Addorsed Scrolls' Radiate-Headed Brooch 019817

Very Rare Thuringian 'Addorsed Scrolls' Radiate-Headed Brooch
Silver-gilt, 11.48 grams, 69.45 mm. 6th century AD. A traditional Frankish bow-brooch comprising a D-shaped headpate with a border bearing punched triangles with niello inlay. The inner field comprises a reserved triangle flanked by scrolls. Around the outer edge is a series of five lobes formed as a tongue-shaped plate with a thick collar. The bow is decorated with five longitudinal ribs, the middle one broader and decorated with offset, opposed punched triangles. The lozengiform footplate features a border decorated with punched triangles surrounding an inner field of four opposed scrolls above a triangle with a median bar. The footplate is formed as a stylized animal-head with a thick brow developing into a nasal bar, almond-shaped eyes and plain lower face. On the reverse, the pieced pin-lug and catchplate are in situ and complete; the pin was lost in antiquity. The brooch is similar in shape and most details of decoration to a pair of radiate-headed bow-brooches from Grave 57 in the Thuringian cemetery at Weimar, Germany, published by Menghin. The finial resembles the human masks found on contemporary Scandinavian brooches more than the normal beast-heads of Merovingian Frankish bow-brooches. Reference: Menghin, W. The Merovingian Period. Europe Without Borders, p.388 item V.3.5.1. Good very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Thuringian 'Addorsed Scrolls' Radiate-Headed Brooch 019817
Anglo-Saxon 'Group I' Cruciform Brooch 021331

Anglo-Saxon 'Group I' Cruciform Brooch
Copper-alloy, 12.92 grams, 58.42 mm. 5th century AD. A good example of one of the earliest types of cruciform brooch, the Group I is distinguished by its single knop which is cast in the round. The headplate is flat and rectangular, the bow deep with a longitudinal incised line, the footplate facetted and the finial in the form of a horse-head with protruding eyes, chevron muzzle and rounded nostril-lobes. The catchplate is in place on the reverse; the spring lug is buried in a ferrous accretion, the remains of the pin. This form of brooch dates from the middle decades of the 5th century, and gave rise to the elaborate cruciform types of the 6th and 7th century. Reference: Hattatt, R. Brooches of Antiquity, Oxford, 1987 item 1297-9. Very fine condition. Provenance: found Harston, Cambridgeshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Group I' Cruciform Brooch 021331
Anglo-Saxon 'Triangular' Buckle 019501

Anglo-Saxon 'Triangular' Buckle
Copper-alloy, 1.95 grams, 26.10 mm. 6th-7th century AD. A miniature version of the classic Merovingian three-boss buckle seen at high-status sites such as Sutton Hoo, Taplow and Prittlewell. The dished elliptical loop is integral with the curved triangular plate which is pierced to accept a thin wire tongue. A pierced attachment lug is in place on the reverse, and the narrow end is pierced by a small rivet. Miniature buckles of this kind were used to fasten shoes and leg-bindings. Reference: West, S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Material from Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998, p.185 item 8. Very fine condition. Provenance: found Stamford Bridge, Yorkshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Triangular' Buckle 019501
Anglo-Saxon 'Convex-Sided' Zoomorphic Strap End 019510

Anglo-Saxon 'Convex-Sided' Zoomorphic Strap End
Copper-alloy and enamel, 5.65 grams, 36.47 mm, 8th-9th century AD. A classic form of Middle Saxon strap end, its rounded upper end with two circular piercings to accept attachment rivets (lost in antiquity). The plain convex sides converge to form an animal-head finial with c-shaped ears, prominent brow and eyes. The central field of the strap end is decorated with a curved zoomorphic design reserved against a recessed field filled with enamel. The upper end is split across its width to accept the end of a strap or narrow belt. Reference: Webster, L & Backhouse, J. The Making of England. Anglo-Saxon Art and Culture AD 600-900, London, 1991, p.98 fig.69n. Very fine condition. Provenance: found Yorkshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Convex-Sided' Zoomorphic Strap End 019510
Saxon 'Hafted' Awl 012045

Saxon 'Hafted' Awl
Iron, 9.77 grams, 112.13 mm. 7th-10th century AD. A hand-tool comprising a round-section pointed shaft rising to a square-section body, with remains of the wooden haft surviving. The sturdy manufacture suggests that the tool was an awl, used for piercing holes in leather and hide. Reference: see the discussion of Middle and Late Anglo-Saxon metalworking technology in Ottaway, P. The Products of the Blacksmith in Mid-Late Anglo-Saxon England, published at www.pjoarchaeology.co.uk/docs/13/anglosaxon-ironwork-part-1.pdf. Fine condition. Provenance: from an old collection.

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Saxon 'Hafted' Awl 012045
Anglo-Saxon ‘Ring-and-Dot’ Dress Pin 012234

Viking Period 'Ring-and-Dot' Dress Pin
Copper-alloy, 8.12 grams, 47.51 mm. 5th-8th century AD. A dress pin of a common Anglo-Saxon type. The head is formed a sub-spherical bulb decorated with a ring-and-dot motif on the summit and four rows of these proceeding down the sides. Below this is a short collar from which emerges the shaft of the pin, tip missing. Pins of this kind were used to fasten cloaks, shawls and outer garments for moderately wealthy females in the Middle Saxon period (circa 650-900 AD). Reference: cf. Webster, L & Backhouse, J. The Making of England. Anglo-Saxon Art and Culture AD 600-900, London, 1991, p.84 fig.66k. Good very fine condition. Provenance: found Ongar, Essex, England.

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Anglo-Saxon ‘Ring-and-Dot’ Dress Pin 012234
Anglo-Saxon 'Polyhedral Head' Hipped Pin 018112

Anglo-Saxon 'Polyhedral Head' Hipped Pin
Copper-alloy, 4.02 grams, 47.06 mm. 5th-6th century AD. A dress pin with a characteristic slight bulb or 'hip' towards the end of the shaft. The head is globular, consisting of four vertical facets with interstitial facets below and above, all bearing a deeply-carved ring-and-dot motif. The top facet is plain. Reference: West. S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Finds From Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998 p.214 fig.96(12) and Webster, L. & Backhouse, J. The Making of England. Anglo-Saxon Art and Culture AD 600-900, London, 1991, p.98 item 69(m) . Very fine condition. Provenance: found Wiltshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Polyhedral Head' Hipped Pin 018112
Anglo-Saxon 'Aviform' Mount 015252

Anglo-Saxon 'Raven's Head Profile' Mount
Copper-alloy, 5.55 grams, 36.83 mm. 10th-11th century AD. A slender D-section mount with heavy decoration. The upper face comprises an animal-head terminal below an opposed pair of similar animal-masks executed in fleshy bands. There is a slight waist where the opposed masks meet and at the lower terminal a slight bifurcation. The attachment peg on the reverse is rounded over, reminiscent of a raven's head in profile. These features in combination give the piece the appearance of a bird with its wings folded along its flanks and its tail spread. The design - animal masks and fleshy foliage - is similar to later examples of the 10th century Winchester Style. Reference: see Backhouse, J., Turner, D.H., Webster, L. The Golden Age of Anglo-Saxon Art 966-1066, London, 1984, p.128 item 133. Very fine condition. Found Burnham Market, Norfolk, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Aviform' Mount 015252
Anglo-Saxon 'Garnet Cloison' Pyramid Mount 019907

Anglo-Saxon 'Garnet Cloison' Pyramid Mount
Copper-alloy and garnet, 4.22 grams, 11.42 mm. 6th-7th century AD. A flat-sided, cast sword pyramid of unusual design - its sides are plain and flat, and rise at a steep angle from the base. The interior is hollow, and the securing bar is intact. The upper surface is decorated with a square, flat garnet set into a shallow cell. Sword pyramids are a short-lived fashion of the later 6th and early 7th century where they functioned as 'sliders' in the suspension of the sword, perhaps for the 'peace-bands' which later sources mention in connection with the rituals of military power. Reference: cf. the example from Barham, Suffolk in West. S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Finds From Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998 p.121 fig.48. Very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Garnet Cloison' Pyramid Mount 019907
Anglo-Saxon 'Hidden Male Face' Mount 020461

Very Rare Anglo-Saxon 'Hidden Male Face' Mount
Gilt copper-alloy, 1.78 grams, 20.52 mm. 6th-7th century AD. A hollow-back cast mount of elliptical form, its decorative panel showing an addorsed pair of Style I animals whose bodies form a stern male face with moustache and beard. To the upper left side one large and one small granule are attached to the border; at the corresponding position on the right the border is damaged. Towards the lower edge the mount has a rectangular extension, with a single granule on the right side. The use of addorsed and opposed animals to create a human face is typical of the 'visual riddling' tradition of Anglo-Saxon art, discussed in Pollington, Kerr & Hammond, 2010. Reference: Pollington, S., Kerr, L. & Hammond, B. Wayland's Work: Anglo-Saxon Art, Myth & Material Culture from the 4th to the 7th Century, Ely, 2010. Very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Hidden Male Face' Mount 020461
Anglo-Saxon 'Human Mask' Brooch Master 019507

Rare Anglo-Saxon 'Human Mask' Brooch Master
Lead, 3.20 grams, 22.66 mm. 5th-6th century AD. The more complex forms of Anglo-Saxon brooch were created by working on the design elements individually in wax, then casting soft lead versions from which the mould could be made for the whole brooch. The lead castings rarely survive, presumably because they were periodically melted down as fashions changed and new design elements were required. The present piece is a rare example of such a lead casting, probably intended for a great square-headed brooch, with the casting channel on the reverse. Reference: the present piece resembles the side extension of the footplate on plate 33(a) Little Wilbraham (Cambridgeshire) in Hines, J. A New Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Great Square-Headed Brooches, Woodbridge, 1997 and Pollington. S., Kerr, L. and Hammond, B. Wayland's Work - Anglo-Saxon Art, Myth and Material Culture from the 4th to the 7th Century, Swaffham, 2010. Very fine condition. Provenance: found Stamford Bridge, Yorkshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Human Mask' Brooch Master 019507
Anglo-Saxon 'Elliptical Loop' Shoe Buckle 019811

Anglo-Saxon 'Elliptical Loop' Shoe Buckle
Copper-alloy, 1.60 grams, 17.96 mm. 5th-7th century AD. A cast buckle with elliptical loop and integral plate, pierced to accept a round-section wire tongue. The plate is pierced at the rear edge to accept two small rivets, still in place, which were flattened over a copper-alloy rove on the reverse. Such a small buckle may have been used to fasten a shoe or purse. Reference: MacGregor, A. & Bolick, E. A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (Non-Ferrous Metals), BAR British Series 230, 1993, item 34.66. Very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Elliptical Loop' Shoe Buckle 019811
Anglo-Saxon 'Openwork Plate' Buckle 018857

Anglo-Saxon 'Openwork Plate'Buckle
Copper-alloy, 11.23 grams, 54.21 mm. 5th-7th century AD. A triangular buckle with elliptical loop and integral triangular plate, the outer edges with incised borders, pierced in three places to accept attachment rivets. The tongue is D-section and passes through a hole in the forward edge of the plate. Openwork buckles are not common in Anglo-Saxon England but occasional examples have been found: e.g. a shield-on-tongue buckle from Faversham, Kent. Reference: MacGregor, A. & Bolick, E. A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (Non-Ferrous Metals), BAR British Series 230, 1993, item 34.18. Fine condition. Provenance: found Essex.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Openwork Plate' Buckle 018857
Saxon 'Belt Money' Decorated Gold Ring 012715

Rare Saxon 'Belt Money' Decorated Gold Ring
Gold, 5.24 grams; 22.39 mm. Internal 21.17 mm, US size 12; UK size X. Circa 6th/7th century AD. A large deep yellow gold band of a very crude style decorated with a single line of punched dots, the ends of the band taper to rounded points and overlap to give a coiled effect. This ring was made from a piece of hack gold intended to be traded or spent, due to its crudeness it can be suggested that the decoration was applied in an attempt at making a temporary wearable piece that would slide onto a belt or finger to ensure it was not lost. Reference: published, Hammond, Brett. British Artefacts, volume I - Early Anglo-Saxon. A rare and very interesting piece in very fine condition. Provenance: found continental Europe in the 1930's, from an old English collection. This item is accompanied by an XRF ancient metal test certificate from Oxford X-ray Fluorescence Ltd.

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Saxon 'Belt Money' Decorated Gold Ring 012715
Anglo-Saxon 'Clasp' Test Casting 017816

Anglo-Saxon ‘Clasp’ Test Casting
Copper-alloy, 8.40 grams, 29.36 mm. 5th-6th century AD. An interesting test casting in copper-alloy. The object was designed to become an Anglian wrist-clasp of Hines's B16 with shaped rear edge. The outline of the clasp has been created in the casting but never cleaned up ready for use: the attachment points have not been pierced, the catchplate has not been slotted and the casting has several rough areas of sprue and flash (spillage). The piece is also almost flat, lacking the characteristic curvature of the finished objects. A fascinating insight into the production process for this artefact type. Reference: Hines, J. Clasps-Hektespenner-Agraffen: Anglo-Scandinavian Clasps of the Third to Sixth Centuries AD. Typology, Diffusion and Function. Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 1993, pp.56, 83-9. Very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection, found Cambridgeshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Clasp' Test Casting 017816
Anglo-Saxon 'Class 'A2 Strap End 020252

Anglo-Saxon 'Class A2' Strap End
Copper-alloy, 5.89 grams, 32.25 mm. 8th-9th century AD. A cast strap end with snub-nosed beast-head terminal. The main decorative zone comprises two ribbed panels beneath a segmented palmette, the upper edges of which respect the two rivet holes. Reference: Thomas, G. Late Anglo-Saxon and Viking-Age Strap-ends 750-1100, Finds Research Group Datasheet 32, Stoke-on-Trent, 2003. Very fine condition. Provenance: found Sleaford, Lincolnshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Class 'A2 Strap End 020252
Frankish 'Symmetrically Opposed Birds' Buckle 020285

Frankish 'Symmetrically Opposed Birds' Buckle
Copper-alloy gilt, 19.94 grams, 56.28 mm. 6th century AD. A cast fixed-plate buckle with hollowed reverse. The dished D-shaped loop features a couch for the tongue flanked by incised trefoils. The tongue bears a rectangular shield at the base, and the shaft of the tongue curves over the forward edge of the loop. The integral plate is formed from opposed and addorsed scrolls and volutes, creating a pair of birds with symmetrically opposed bodies. The lower ends of two pierced fixing lugs are in place on the reverse. Reference: cf. the buckle from Molain (France) in Menghin, W. The Merovingian Period - Europe Without Borders, Berlin, 2007 item VII.23.6 and an Anglo-Saxon example from Icklingham in MacGregor, A. & Bolick, E. A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (Non-Ferrous Metals), Oxford, 1993, item 32.23. Very fine condition, some gilding remaining. Provenance: from an old collection.

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Frankish 'Symmetrically Opposed Birds' Buckle 020285
Viking / Anglo-Scandinavian 'Faux Twist' Finger Ring 013623

Viking / Anglo-Scandinavian 'Faux Twist' Finger Ring
Copper-alloy, 6.05 grams, 25.78 mm ext.dia. 18.01 mm. int.dia. (British size P½, European 16.55, USA 7¾). 9th-11th century AD. A sturdy finger ring of Viking or Anglo-Scandinavian type comprising an expanding cast band with modelled spiral detailing, imitating the classic form of twisted wire rings from Scandinavia. Reference: cf. expanding twisted silver wire rings in the Norwegian Malvik hoard in Hårdh, B. Silver in the Viking Age: A Regional-Economic Study, Acta Archaeologica Lundensia 25, Stockholm, 1996 p.148. Very fine condition. Provenance: from an old European collection.

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Viking / Anglo-Scandinavian 'Faux Twist' Finger Ring 013623
Anglo-Saxon 'Silver Filigree Class A2' Strap End 020253

Anglo-Saxon 'Silver Filigree Class A2' Strap End
Copper-alloy, 4.40 grams, 22.07 mm. 8th-9th century AD. A Class A2 convex-sided strap end with two domed silver rivets. The surface bears inlaid fine silver filigree s-scroll decoration in two symmetrical panels. The piece is broken above the animal-head finial. Reference: Thomas, G. Late Anglo-Saxon and Viking-Age Strap-ends 750-1100: Part I, The Finds Research Group AD700-1700, Datasheet 32, Sleaford, 2008. Extremely fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Silver Filigree Class A2' Strap End 020253
Alemannic 'Openwork' Buckle 019145

Alemannic 'Openwork' Buckle
Copper-alloy, 17.43 grams, 50.97 mm. 5th-6th century AD. A buckle with loop and plate cast in one. The rectangular loop features a broad front edge with a couch for the tongue. From the back edge of the loop develops a waisted panel which is pierced to accept the triangular tongue; behind this is the D-shaped plate with scroll- and pelta-shaped piercings. There are lobed projections on the upper, lower and rear edges of the plate, on the reverse of which are three D-shaped lugs (two complete) with transverse piercings to accept a securing pin or wire. The style of the buckle is heavily influenced by contemporary Byzantine fashion, especially in the use of scrolled decoration. Reference: cf. the Lombard buckle from Brianza and the Alemannic example from Gutenstein in Menghin, W. The Merovingian Period. Europe Without Borders, Munich, 2007 p.413 item VI.3.8.2 and p.554 item VIII.11.1. Good very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Alemannic 'Openwork' Buckle 019145
Anglo-Saxon 'Garnet Eye' Bird Brooch 020533

Anglo-Saxon 'Garnet Eye' Bird Brooch
Copper-alloy and garnet, 4.92 grams, 37.32 mm. 6th century AD. An unusual cast bird-brooch modelled as a D-section head and body with a flat, trapezoidal tail. The neck is marked by a zone of transverse banding, and the wing is separated from the rest of the body by a similar feature. The bird's eye is created from an inset garnet cloison. The pin-lug in place on the reverse, within the iron corrosion products from the pin; the catchplate is mostly present. Bird brooches are a Frankish fashion, adopted across northern Europe in the Merovingian period. Reference: cf. MacGregor, A. & Bolick, E. A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (Non-Ferrous Metals), Oxford, 1993, p.154. Very fine condition. Provenance: found at Thetford, Norfolk, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Garnet Eye' Bird Brooch 020533
Anglo-Saxon 'Polychrome' Glass Bead Assemblage 019913

Anglo-Saxon 'Polychrome' Glass Bead Assemblage
Glass, 16.04 grams as strung, diameter from 4.13 to 14.81 mm. 5th-6th century AD. A group of Anglian beads normally worn on the chest strung between penannular or small-long brooches. The group comprises: one white globular with median blue trail and irregular red dots; one translucent green annular; one green globular with red, yellow and white trails; ten small blue globular; five small blue biconical; one small green ribbed globular; three small yellow globular; one small yellow cylindrical. The beads were recovered from the Catterick area (Yorkshire) which is usually identified as the site of the late 6th or early 7th century battle of Catraeth immortalized in the Old Welsh poem Y Gododdin in which a troop of three hundred horsemen from the fortress of Din Eidyn attacked an unnamed but overwhelming enemy force and was wiped out. The case has been made for the British horsemen having set off from the area of modern Edinburgh to attack an Anglian (English) stronghold, although the poem does not mention either the location of the battle or the name of the enemy. Reference: cf. the glass bead forms in Brugmann, B. Glass Beads from Early Anglo-Saxon Graves, Oxford, 2004 and discussion of the poem in Cessford, C. Where are the Anglo-Saxons in the Gododdin poem? in Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History, vol. 8, Oxford, 1995. Extremely fine condition. Provenance: found Catterick, North Yorkshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Polychrome' Glass Bead Assemblage 019913
Anglo-Saxon 'Serpent Head' Firesteel 019126

Anglo-Saxon 'Serpent Head' Firesteel
Copper-alloy and iron, 35.22 grams, 43.63 mm. 10th-11th century AD. An openwork cast 'looped' handle for a firesteel in the form of a long, triangular serpentine head with punched-dot eyes and nostrils, and extended tongue in late Anglo- Scandinavian style. The reverse edge of the firesteel is decorated with three parallel incised lines. There is ferrous incrustation from the steel striking plate on the side surfaces. Reference: cf. firesteels illustrated in Lehtosalo-Hillander, P-L. Luistari II, Helsinki, 1982 p.74. Very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Serpent Head' Firesteel 019126
Anglo-Saxon 'Cast' Barrel Key 020418

Anglo-Saxon 'Cast' Barrel Key
Copper-alloy, 4.68 grams, 37.38 mm. Circa 8th-10th century AD. A barrel key of Type III cast in copper-alloy. The bit is a simple bar with a right-angled tooth on the leading edge. The key has a thick shaft with hollow fore-end, solid circular bow and retaining knop. Reference: cf. simple openwork key from Barham in West. S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Finds From Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998 p.122 item 58. Very fine condition. Provenance: found in the English Midlands.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Cast' Barrel Key 020418
Anglo-Saxon 'Woden Head' Seal Matrix 020379

Excessively Rare Anglo-Saxon 'Woden Head' Seal Matrix
Copper-alloy, 2.81 grams, 16.92 mm. 7th-9th century AD. A thin (1.8 mm) flan seal matrix bearing the impression of a bell-shaped male bust with the legend HIA to the left and MOH to the right. The layout of the design is reminiscent of the 'Woden Head' series of sceatt coins. The reverse is plain apart from a slight incised border. This type of seal matrix would have been attached into a metal or wooden handle. Reference: cf. coin designs in Abramson, T. Sceattas: An Illustrated Guide, King's Lynn, 2006 p.74-5. Very fine condition. Provenance: found Bishop's Stortford, Essex, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Woden Head' Seal Matrix 020379
Anglo-Saxon 'Birds of Prey' Pelta Mount 020537

Rare Anglo-Saxon 'Birds of Prey' Pelta Mount
Gilt copper-alloy, 5.17 grams, 33.05 mm. 6th-7th century AD. A cast mount in the form of a stem with a pelta-shaped terminal. The central column bears a pattern of three-strand knotwork within a border, from the outer edges of which emerge two bird-heads. The upper end of the column was broken in antiquity, and shows a similar knotwork design placed at rightangles. Most pelta mounts are separate panels, meant to be attached to horse harness; the presence of the transverse design on this example suggests that the mount was cast in a single piece rather than as a central roundel with radiating pelta-shaped plates (as seen, for example, on the bridle from Sutton Hoo Mound 17). The beaks on the bird-head terminals are cast rather thick, with a u-shaped indentation indicating the opening. Reference: cf. Carver, M. Sutton Hoo. A Seventh Century Princely Burial Ground and its Context, Society of Antiquaries Report no.69, London, 2005 p.229 and examples in Pollington, S., Kerr, L. & Hammond, B. Wayland's Work - Anglo-Saxon Art, Myth and Material Culture from the 4th to the 7th century, Swaffham, 2010 p.380. Very fine condition. Provenance: found near Rendlesham, Suffolk, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Birds of Prey' Pelta Mount 020537
Late Roman, Saxon Inspiring 'Man Between Beasts' Openwork Mount 019889

Late Roman, Saxon Inspiring 'Man Between Beasts' Openwork Mount
Silver, 1.56 grams, 13.55 mm. 4th-5th century AD. A finely made openwork fitting in the form of a human bust between confronted beasts - possibly bears or wolves. This motif played some part in late Roman iconography and was later given the Christian interpretation of 'Daniel in the Lion's Den'. Reference: cf. openwork mounts in Read, B. Metal Artefacts of Antiquity, vol.1, Langport, 2001. Very fine condition. Provenance: found continental Europe.

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Late Roman, Saxon Inspiring 'Man Between Beasts' Openwork Mount 019889
Anglo-Saxon 'Style I Tiermensch' Mount 020417

Anglo-Saxon 'Style I Tiermensch' Mount
Copper-alloy, gilded, 3.10 grams, 25.55 mm. 5th-6th century AD. A cast tongue-shaped mount bearing raised Style I decoration in the form of a three-band beast-man with ribbon body, rear leg curled beneath and his head curled over so that his jaw closes on his midriff. The heavy gilding remains on most of the surface. There are two attachment pegs on the reverse, the taller of about 5mm in length. It is likely that the mount comes from the decorative metal rim of a drinking horn. Reference: cf. fitting from Barham, Suffolk, iWest. Sussex. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Finds From Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998 p.123 fig.71. Very fine condition. Provenance: found Dorset, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Style I Tiermensch' Mount 020417
Anglo-Saxon 'Lozenge Panel' Strap End 019730

Anglo-Saxon 'Lozenge Panel' Strap End
Copper-alloy, 3.24 grams, 44.71 mm. 8th-9th century AD. A Middle Saxon strap end with convex sides tapering to a beast-head terminal. The upper edge is 'scalloped' where the two rivet-holes are placed. The main decorative panel is a series of four vesica-shaped elements placed to form a central reserved lozenge, all textured with punched dot detailing. A transverse ribbed collar extends to the triangular beast-head terminal. The strap end is too light to have been used on a leather strap and may have been used on a fabric braid. Reference: West. S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Finds From Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998 p.132 item 2 and p.162 item 9. Good very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Lozenge Panel' Strap End 019730
Anglo-Saxon 'Interlaced Beast' Class A2 Strap End 020416

Rare Anglo-Saxon 'Interlaced Beast' Class A2 Strap End
Silver, 4.66 grams, 42.97 mm. 8th-9th century AD. A cast strap end of the classic convex-sided format comprising a palmette motif below the attachment holes. The central panel features a single Trewhiddle Style beast enmeshed within an interlace design. The finial is a blunt-muzzled beast-head with a palmette on its brow. The execution of the animal design is unusually crisp and carefully made, and the animal's double outline is reminiscent of earlier Style II beasts. The silver rivets are still present within the holes. Reference: Thomas, G. Late Anglo-Saxon and Viking-Age Strap-ends 750-1100: Part I, The Finds Research Group AD700-1700, Datasheet 32, Sleaford, 2008. Extremely fine condition. Provenance: from an old collection formed in the 1980's.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Interlaced Beast' Class A2 Strap End 020416
Anglo-Saxon 'Pelletted Cross' Nummular Disc Brooch 015390

Anglo-Saxon 'Pelletted Cross' Nummular Disc Brooch
Lead, 22.80 grams, 39.74 mm. 10th century AD. Nummular brooches feature designs drawn from contemporary coins. The plate features a central design of a broad saltire emanating from a central boss, with narrow bands between, on a field of pellets, with a beaded border. Around this is a border of three concentric bands. On the reverse the catchplate and spring lug are still present. Reference: for a similar coin design of a saltire with interstitial lines, see Abramson, T. Sceattas - An Illustrated Guide, Kings Lynn, 2006, p.110. Very fine condition. Ex an old American collection.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Pelletted Cross' Nummular Disc Brooch 015390
Anglo-Scandinavian 'Spoked' Disc Brooch 017777

Rare Anglo-Scandinavian 'Spoked' Disc Brooch
Copper-alloy and enamel, 7.10 grams, 27.66 mm. 10th-11th century AD. A rare form of Late Saxon or Anglo-Scandinavian disc brooch comprising a central enamel panel surrounded by four radiating knops filled with enamel cabochons (two remaining). The central panel is a light blue enamel background with an inset dark blue panel, with a white enamel centre. The pin-lug and attachment point for the catchplate are in place on the reverse. Reference: West. S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Finds From Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998 p.121 fig.48. Fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Anglo-Scandinavian 'Spoked' Disc Brooch 017777
Anglo-Saxon 'Knotwork' Buckle and Plate 010409

Rare Anglo-Saxon 'Knotwork' Buckle and Plate
Copper-alloy, 21.99 grams, 73.10 mm. 6th century. A fine early Anglo-Saxon buckle and plate complete with its iron pin. This excellently preserved piece has most of its heavy silver plating still intact. The design is visible on the centre panel of the buckle plate: a rectilinear knotwork design. The iron pin and hinge between the buckle and plate are intact and stable. Reference: Marzinzik, S. Early Anglo-Saxon Belt Buckles (Late 5th to Early 8th Centuries A.D.). Their Classification and Context BAR British Series 357, Oxford, 2003, pl.87. Published: Hammond, Brett. British Artefacts, volume I - Early Anglo-Saxon. Very fine condition. Found Lincolnshire.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Knotwork' Buckle and Plate 010409
Anglo-Saxon 'Triangular' Buckle 019340

Anglo-Saxon 'Triangular' Buckle
Copper-alloy, 5.01 grams, 37.95 mm. 6th-7th century AD. A miniature version of the classic Merovingian three-boss buckle seen at high-status sites such as Sutton Hoo, Taplow and Prittlewell. The dished elliptical loop is integral with the triangular plate with semicircular lobes at the forward end and a pelta-shaped finial. The lobes feature ring-and-dot detailing within an incised double border; the finial bears a third ring-and-dot motif. There are traces of silvering on the plate; the pin was lost in antiquity. The pierced attachment lugs are in place on the reverse. Miniature buckles of this kind were used to fasten shoes and leg-bindings. Reference: West, S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Material from Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998, p.185 item 8. Very fine condition. Provenance: found Suffolk, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Triangular' Buckle 019340
Anglo-Saxon 'Form B17' Wrist Clasp 017032

Anglo-Saxon ‘Form B17’ Wrist Clasp
Copper-alloy, 3.82 grams, 30.61 mm. 5th-6th century AD. An Anglian wrist clasp of Hines's Form B17, its plate bears three scooped lugs, the outer two pierced for attachment to the cuff of a female's shift. The plate has a thin vertical bar, stepped and with two rectangular panels decorated with transverse banding. The catchplate attachment points are visible but the cast plate was lost in antiquity. Wrist clasps were a long-lived fashion among Anglian women, used in pairs to close the cuffs of their long-sleeved shifts. Reference: Hines, J. Clasps-Hektespenner-Agraffen: Anglo-Scandinavian Clasps of the Third to Sixth Centuries AD. Typology, Diffusion and Function. Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 1993, p.57. Fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection, found Cambridgeshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Form B17' Wrist Clasp 017032
Anglo-Saxon 'Globular' Pin Head 013070

Anglo-Saxon 'Globular' Pin Head
Copper-alloy, 2.72 grams, 17.08 mm. 7th-9th century AD. A hollow spherical bulb with three sets of heart-shaped double-scroll filigree in the upper and lower hemispheres. A narrow pierced collar enclosed the pin, which was lost in antiquity. Similar to the find from Bredfield, Suffolk. Reference: West, S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Material from Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology, Ipswich, 1998, p.127 fig.3. Extremely fine condition. Provenance: from an old collection, found Bishops Stortford, Essex, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Globular' Pin Head 013070
Anglo-Saxon 'Applied Trail' Glass Bead Assemblage 019917

Anglo-Saxon 'Applied Trail' Glass Bead Assemblage
Glass, 5.15 grams as strung, diameter from 6.92 to 13.02 mm. 5th-6th century AD. A group of Anglian beads normally worn on the chest strung between penannular or small-long brooches. The group comprises: one large, dark blue barrel-shaped with twist trails in turquoise and yellow; two turquoise globulars; one pale blue globular; one pale blue discoid. The beads were recovered from the Catterick area (Yorkshire) which is usually identified as the site of the late 6th or early 7th century battle of Catraeth immortalized in the Old Welsh poem Y Gododdin in which a troop of three hundred horsemen from the fortress of Din Eidyn attacked an unnamed but overwhelming enemy force and was wiped out. The case has been made for the British horsemen having set off from the area of modern Edinburgh to attack an Anglian (English) stronghold, although the poem does not mention either the location of the battle or the name of the enemy. Reference: cf. the glass bead forms in Brugmann, B. Glass Beads from Early Anglo-Saxon Graves, Oxford, 2004 and discussion of the poem in Cessford, C. Where are the Anglo-Saxons in the Gododdin poem? in Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History, vol. 8, Oxford, 1995. Extremely fine condition. Provenance: found Catterick, North Yorkshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Applied Trail' Glass Bead Assemblage 019917
Anglo-Saxon 'Animal-Headed' Fastener 017147

Anglo-Saxon ‘Animal-Headed’ Fastener
Copper-alloy, 6.88 grams, 37.40 mm. 8th century AD. A finely modelled hooked fastener of Mid-Saxon date. The lozengiform plate features a central rosette composed from four chip-carved elliptical panels with interstitial triangles. The ropework border is edged by a frame which develops into three pierced loops (two remaining). From the lower point a short shank emerges, with animal-head detailing. The hooked portion emerges below the animal's mouth. The purpose of the item is probably as a book-mount, belt-mount or fastener rather than as a hooked tag for textile clothing: the end of the hook is thick and rounded whereas clothes tags are normally sharply pointed. Reference: West. S. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Finds From Suffolk, East Anglian Archaeology 84, Ipswich, 1998 p.244 fig.1 (Shottisham). Cleaned, conserved and in very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Animal-Headed' Fastener 017147
Anglo-Saxon ‘Form B2' Wrist Clasp 019495

Excessively Rare Anglo-Saxon 'Form B2' Wrist Clasp
Copper-alloy and gilding, 4.57 grams, 33.02 mm. 5th-6th century AD. A wrist clasp of Hines's Form B2 which is most strongly associated with eastern Scandinavia and the shores of the Baltic Sea; no Anglo-Saxon examples are published in the standard reference works. The hooked clasp comprises a front beaded panel with a rear section made up from conjoined c-shaped domed roundels. Beneath the upper end on the reverse is a pierced lug; in use, the lug was pushed through the cloth of the cuff and a backplate was sewn into place to trap the fabric. The lower end below the short hook was lost in antiquity. The heavy gilding is still present in the recesses. Wrist clasps were used on the cuffs of female dresses; the connection to Scandinavia implies that the Anglian settlements were still strengthening their marriage-ties to the Scandinavian homelands. Reference: Hines, J. Clasps-Hektespenner-Agraffen: Anglo-Scandinavian Clasps of the Third to Sixth Centuries AD. Typology, Diffusion and Function. Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 1993, p.34. Good very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Anglo-Saxon ‘Form B2' Wrist Clasp 019495
Anglo-Saxon 'Polygonal Head' Hipped Pin 019513

Anglo-Saxon 'Polygonal Head' Hipped Pin
Copper-alloy, 5.65 grams, 73.29 mm. 5th-8th century AD. A cast dress pin with a square-section head moulded as a series of facetted blocks. The shaft of the pin has a slight bulb or 'hip' to prevent it falling out of the cloth it secured, a feature of many early Anglo-Saxon garment pins. Reference: MacGregor, A. & Bolick, E. A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (Non-Ferrous Metals), BAR British Series 230, 1993, item 31.7, 31.11. Very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Polygonal Head' Hipped Pin 019513
Anglo-Saxon 'Filigree' Zoomorphic Strap End 014406

Anglo-Saxon 'Filigree' Zoomorphic Strap End
Copper-alloy, 7.17 grams 41.36 mm. 8th century AD. The strap end is of the split-end type with two rivet-holes, one of which is still present. The upper field is divided into three triangular panels, the outer two of which develop from looped beast’s ears. Below these the central nasal extends down to a bulbous terminal, with two lateral elliptical panels bearings roundels for the eyes. On the three upper panels and the nasal there are remains of very delicate silver filigree and niello panels in complex scrolled patterns. Reference: Smith, R.A. British Museum Guide to Anglo-Saxon Antiquities, London, 1923, p.107, fig.131 and compare the beast motif atop the nasal of the Coppergate helmet in Webster, L & Backhouse, J. The Making of England. Anglo-Saxon Art and Culture AD 600-900, London, 1991, p.60-2 fig.47 (detail). Good very fine condition.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Filigree' Zoomorphic Strap End 014406
Anglo-Saxon 'Foliate' Zoomorphic Strap End 002867

Anglo-Saxon 'Foliate' Zoomorphic Strap End
Silver, 3.87 grams, 35.39 mm. Circa 9th century AD. The lower edge of this piece bears the standard zoomorphic head design, executed as a v-shaped incision to emphasise the snout below a brow-ridge and two stylized ears. The outer edges are decorated with billeted zones enclosing a field of foliate vinescroll detail. Two rounded lobes on the upper edge are pierced by rivet-holes. The piece is complete with good definition to the surface details. Reference: Smith, R.A. British Museum Guide to Anglo-Saxon Antiquities, Trustees of the British Museum, 1923 p.107, fig.131(3). Published: Hammond, Brett. British Artefacts, volume 2 - Middle Saxon & Viking, Witham, 2010. Very fine condition. Ex old American collection.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Foliate' Zoomorphic Strap End 002867
Anglo-Saxon 'Beast-Head' Strap End 019276

Anglo-Saxon 'Beast-Head' Strap End
Copper-alloy, 9.18 grams, 46.41 mm. Circa 10th century AD. A narrow copper-alloy strap end of a type influenced by Scandinavian design, the split end plain with a single piercing, and with the rivet still in place; the plate developing into an animal head in plan in the form of a serpent with lentoid eyes and powerful jaws gripping a dragon-head executed in profile with its prominent lower jaw, fangs and snout forming the terminal of the piece; the profile head executed in Ringerike Style and pierced in two places; the whole piece modelled in the round with detail on the reverse. Reference: cf. less elaborate strap end in Webster, L & Backhouse, J. The Making of England. Anglo-Saxon Art and Culture AD 600-900, London, 1991, p.98 fig.85. Published: Hammond, Brett. British Artefacts, volume 2 - Middle Saxon & Viking, Witham, 2010. Extremely fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Beast-Head' Strap End 019276
Anglo-Saxon 'Silver-Inlaid' Zoomorphic Strap End 019725

Anglo-Saxon 'Silver-Inlaid' Zoomorphic Strap End
Copper-alloy and silver, 3.78 grams, 36.60 mm. 8th-9th century AD. An unusual strap end featuring a scrolled upper edge with two piercings to accept rivets, with a pelta-shaped panel between. The main panel features four elliptical panels with silver inlay, with two triangular panels between. the beast-head terminal has spiral ears and a silver-inlaid panel on the brow above a stubby, square muzzle. The piece is divided lengthwise to accept a belt or strap. Reference: Webster, L & Backhouse, J. The Making of England. Anglo-Saxon Art and Culture AD 600-900, London, 1991, p.98 fig.69n. Very fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Silver-Inlaid' Zoomorphic Strap End 019725
Anglo-Saxon 'Tonsured Bust' Disc Brooch 007191

Anglo-Saxon 'Tonsured Bust' Disc Brooch
Copper-alloy, 4.21 grams, 20.12 mm. An unusual and rare type: within a border of three concentric circles, a ‘tonsured’ bust is depicted. Such busts are confined to the issues of leading churchmen, such as Wulfred, archbishop of Canterbury (fl.805-32). Full-face male busts on disc are associated with Saxon button brooches. However, while the motif could be viewed as a simplified form of the standard male face (e.g. Avent & Evison, pl.XVII 26.2, 26.3), button brooches are a 5th to 6th century fastener type, and the lack of an everted rim suggests that this is a later disc brooch, probably a nummular type with a central motif based on a coin design. Nummular brooches are a 9th century fashion, which strengthens the connection to Wulfred or one of his contemporaries. Reference: Avent, R. & Evison, V.I. Anglo-Saxon Button Brooches in Archaeologia, vol.CVII, 1982 ; Abramson, T. Sceattas: An Illustrated Guide p.75, Series Q1G, item Q1X800. Published: Hammond, Brett. British Artefacts, volume I - Early Anglo-Saxon. Very fine condition. Found Norfolk.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Tonsured Bust' Disc Brooch 007191
Anglo-Saxon 'Spiral' Saucer Brooch 001247

Anglo-Saxon 'Spiral' Saucer Brooch
Copper-alloy, 12.57 grams, 27.20 mm. West Saxon, early 6th century AD. The outer rim of this brooch is shallow in comparison with other examples, rising to a pronounced annular ridge enclosing a further, inner ridge from which five running spirals depend; the spirals are inverted at the ends. The central pentagon contains an annulet. The surface has a fine patination. Reference: MacGregor, A. & Bolick, E. A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (Non-Ferrous Metals) BAR British Series 230, 1993, p.45 item 2.16. Found Oxfordshire, 2002.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Spiral' Saucer Brooch 001247
Anglo-Scandinavian 'Knotwork' Strap Fitting 020266

Very Rare Anglo-Scandinavian / Viking 'Knotwork' Strap Fitting
Copper-alloy, 13.60 grams, 35.90 mm. 10th-11th century AD. A belt or strap fitting in the form of a triangular mount with pierced lobe terminal and a second piercing in the centre; the main design is a knotwork panel. Below this is a transverse slot to accept a strap, belt or bridle. The findspot is close to the site of a battle in 991 AD between the local Essex ealdormann, Byrhtnoþ, and a Viking army commanded by Ólaf Tryggvason, commemorated in the Old English poem The Battle of Maldon. Reference: cf. design on cast strap-end in Wilson, D.M. Anglo-Saxon Metalwork 700-1100 in the British Museum, London, 1964, item 135. Very fine condition. Provenance: found Maldon, Essex, England.

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Anglo-Scandinavian 'Knotwork' Strap Fitting 020266
Anglo-Saxon 'Form B14a Roundels' Wrist Clasp 017029

Anglo-Saxon ‘Form B14a Roundels' Wrist Clasp
Copper-alloy, 3.57 grams, 28.82 mm. 5th-6th century AD. An Anglian wrist clasp of Hines's Form B14a, formed as a vertical bar with three lugs on the back edge, with perforations for attachment to the cuff of a female's shift. The bar features three raised panels with transverse banded decoration and two D-section rectangular panels between. The catchplate is still substantially in place on the front plate. Wrist clasps were a long-lived fashion among Anglian women, used in pairs to close the cuffs of their long-sleeved shifts. Reference: Hines, J. Clasps-Hektespenner-Agraffen: Anglo-Scandinavian Clasps of the Third to Sixth Centuries AD. Typology, Diffusion and Function. Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 1993, p.54. Good fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection, found Cambridgeshire, England.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Form B14a Roundels' Wrist Clasp 017029