Anglo-Saxon Disc & Saucer Brooches for sale

Disc brooches are a common 5th to 6th century fastener, found in southern and eastern England and concentrated in the Upper Thames Valley, where it is presumed that they were developed and manufactured. There are no known Continental prototypes for this form of brooch, so it may have been an Anglo-Saxon innovation. They are predominantly of copper-alloy, but often tinned or gilded; decoration is confined to punched and incised detailing on the early examples, but later zoomorphic motifs are found. Some examples have notched or serrated rims. Another later variant is the ‘nummular’ brooch, which bears decoration drawn from coin forms.

Saucer brooches are normally single castings in copper-alloy, worn by adult females at the shoulders to secure a peplos dress. The plain rim is usually flared or angled away from the flat central surface – whence the ‘saucer’ designation. They are found with a concentration in the Thames Valley but occur sporadically across East Anglia, the south-east, the south and west Midlands. There are regional preferences in decoration, with running spirals the commonest form.

Customers and site-visitors may have noticed that the Anglo-Saxon site pages have been revised. As part of our ongoing programme of improving the quality and reliability of our site, all of the ‘Saxon’ pages have been amended in the light of further detailed research. We aim to roll this out across the rest of the site in due course. Please check back for updates.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Repousse' Pseudo-Coin Pendant 028151

Anglo-Saxon 'Repousse' Pseudo-Coin Pendant
Copper-alloy, 1.10 grams, 20.47 mm. 10th-11th century AD. A repousse pseudo-coin Pendant affixed to a plain back showing an expanding cross with pellet in ends and large annulet at centre, vertical lines in lieu of a legend with loop to reverse. Fine condition, rare. Provenance: ex Penfold collection, discovered 'mudlarking' on Thames foreshore, 1970s-80s.

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Anglo-Saxon 'Repousse' Pseudo-Coin Pendant 028151
Anglo-Saxon 'Jewelled Key-Stone' Disc Brooch Fragment 027528

Anglo-Saxon 'Jewelled Key-Stone' Disc Brooch Fragment
Gilt-bronze, 6.75 grams, 31.07 mm. 6th century AD. A 'jewelled' disc brooch with ropework border and triangular panels surrounding the central cell. Reference: cf. MacGregor & Bollick, A Summary Catalogue of the Anglo-Saxon Collections (Non-Ferrous Metals), item 6.2. Fine condition. Provenance: found Kent, UK.
£60.00

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Anglo-Saxon 'Jewelled Key-Stone' Disc Brooch Fragment 027528
Anglo-Saxon 'Profile Bust' Nummular Disc Brooch 019410

Anglo-Saxon 'Profile Bust' Nummular Disc Brooch
Copper-alloy, 3.02 grams, 21.40 mm. 9th-10th century AD. An Anglo-Saxon copper-alloy nummular brooch with a carefully detailed central bust within a concentric billeted double border. The catchplate and pin-lugs are partially present on the reverse. Reference: Cook, B. and Williams, G. (eds.) Coinage and History in the North Sea World, c. AD 500-1200. Essays in Honour of Marion Archibald, Brill, 2006. This work includes a chapter by Dr. Kevin Leahy on Anglo-Saxon coin brooches, pp. 267-85. Leahy illustrates three nummular brooches, dated to the 9th and 10th centuries, which he suggests were copied from either the gold coinage of Louis the Pious (814-840) or late Roman coinage. Published: Hammond, Brett. British Artefacts, volume 2 - Middle Saxon & Viking, Witham, 2010. Good fine condition. Provenance: from an old English collection, found East Anglia, England.
£110.00

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Anglo-Saxon 'Profile Bust' Nummular Disc Brooch 019410
Anglo-Saxon ‘Expanding Arm Cross’ Nummular Brooch 014657

Anglo-Saxon 'Expanding Arm Cross' Nummular Brooch
Copper-alloy, 13.04 grams, 33.25 mm. 10th century AD. A large form of nummular brooch, its design clearly drawn from the layout of contemporary coins. The central field features an expanding arm cross with central roundel; around this is a billetted band, surrounded by a band featuring roundels. The outer band is billetted. The attachment loop and catchplate are intact; the loop of the iron pin is trapped within the attachment loop. Reference: for expanding arm coins see Backhouse, J. Turner, D.H. & Webster, L. The Golden Age of Anglo-Saxon Art 966-1066, London, 1984, p.184 and figs.227-8. Published: Hammond, Brett. British Artefacts, volume 2 - Middle Saxon & Viking, Witham, 2010. Very fine condition.
£140.00

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Anglo-Saxon ‘Expanding Arm Cross’ Nummular Brooch 014657


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